Summer Residential Research Programs

Overview

 

 

Harvard College BLISS is a 10-week summer program that aims to build community and stimulate creativity among a small cohort of Harvard undergraduate researchers in the social sciences. BLISS fellows work on research projects with Harvard-affiliated faculty and researchers. Fellows live together in one of the Harvard College houses and participate in rich evening programming which includes both social and academic activities. To participate in BLISS, you must apply and be selected to work on one of the pre-designated BLISS research projects (usually announced in mid-January). 

Program Details

 

ABOUT BLISS

The Harvard College Behavioral Laboratory in the Social Sciences (BLISS) was launched in summer 2011, at the recommendation of the Dean of Social Science in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the Dean of Harvard College, with the goal of stimulating community and creativity among a small cohort of motivated Harvard undergraduates in the social sciences. The Program seeks to create a diverse group of Fellows, including but not limited to, women and underrepresented minorities who are inspired by and are committed to social science research. Recently, we have found that our acronym discouraged non-laboratory-based social science researchers from participating. So, BLISS doesn’t stand for anything at all right now except for the amazing summer experience you might have! (We are looking for alternative program titles that work with the BLISS acronym, however. Feel free to send suggestions to jmsheph@fas.harvard.edu.)

BENEFITS


BLISS offers a variety of benefits to ensure a successful summer research experience and enable fellows to form a close-knit community:

  • Free lodging in designated Harvard housing
  • A partial boarding plan (dining)
  • A modest research support stipend for the 10-week program
  • For financial aid recipients: a term-bill credit fully covering the amount of the student's Summer Savings obligation as determined by the Financial Aid Office

 

COMPONENTS & EXPECTATIONS

Program benefit and financial support are meant to enable BLISS fellows to form a close-knit residential community. Therefore, BLISS Fellows are expected to participate and contribute to the community of scholars in evening enrichment activities throughout the term of the Program. While many activities are voluntary, other BLISS activities, especially those associated with Harvard faculty, are required for all Fellows. 

 

 

More specifically, BLISS consists of the following components:

  • Research experience: The intent of the program is to provide a formative and substantive research experience over ten weeks of the summer, working on a project designed by specified Harvard faculty. Prospective participants will select preferences from an array of BLISS-designated research projects on the application. Selected participants will be matched with a research project and its hosting faculty mentor.
  • Residential life and community: BLISS Fellows will live together in one of the River Houses for the duration of the Program. Dining: Weekday evening meal service will be available in Dudley House and a modest stipend will be available to purchase food for weekend meals and weekday lunches.
  • Special Campus-wide Events and Evening Programs: Special evening programming featuring prominent researchers and scientists in the Harvard community and the Boston area will be open to all Harvard undergraduates. Seminars for BLISS Fellows will include a number of topics specifically designed to augment and enrich their knowledge about research and careers in academia. Topics such as research ethics, poster presentations, and post-graduate career opportunities will be offered throughout the Program. In addition, Fellows will have the opportunity to practice speaking about their research, in both small and large groups throughout the summer.
  • Recreational and Social Programs: BLISS Fellows are eligible to register for free use of Harvard athletic facilities (including the Malkin Athletic Center, Hemenway Gymnasium, and Blodgett Pool). A calendar of activities will include a range of opportunities to socialize and take advantage of Boston's cultural and recreational summer offerings, including a variety of excursions, Red Sox games, and Fellow-initiated community events sponsored by URAF for the College-affiliated research programs.

 

Project Descriptions - ***2017 NOW AVAILABLE***

 

PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS
 

* Summer 2017: project descriptions for summer 2017 can be found here.

* Summer 2016: project descriptions for summer 2016 can be found here.

* Summer 2015: project descriptions for summer 2015 can be found here.

* Summer 2014: project descriptions for summer 2014 can be found here.

* Summer 2013: project descriptions for summer 2013 can be found here.

Eligibility & Selection

ELIGIBILITY

  • Any continuing Harvard College undergraduate student in good standing
  • Must be able to commit 10 weeks* to summer research on campus

* Note: individuals taking summer school courses, preparing for summer graduate school entrance exams, or engaging in full-time public service projects are not eligible to participate in BLISS.

SELECTION


A primary purpose of the program is to build and foster a strong and diverse community of social science scholars. Selection will be based on applicant responses to the essay questions and comments in letters of reference that the applicant is strongly suited for a successful summer enrichment experience.  

A successful application will demonstrate the following:

  1. A strong dedication to developing or furthering academic interest and scholarly excellence in social science research;
  2. An eagerness to conduct research in one of the designated projects, and articulation of how that experience would enhance the applicant’s academic pursuits.
  3. The ability and desire to participate successfully and enthusiastically in a diverse residential community of scholars, and the likelihood of benefiting from this participation;
  4. An academic record demonstrating success in coursework that develops theoretical knowledge and/or practical application of academic principles in research;
  5. A commitment to participate and contribute for the full ten weeks of the Program. Evaluation of the applicant will be based on how well the components of the application define and address these qualities and requirements.

Application - Deadline February 22, 2017

 

BLISS APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

The deadline for receipt of COMPLETE application materials is 5:00pm EST, February 22, 2017.  INCOMPLETE OR LATE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED.


_____________________________________________________________________________


STEP 1:  READ

Read the BLISS program and project descriptions carefully and determine up to three projects in which you’d like to participate.
 

STEP 2:  SOLICIT RECOMMENDATION

One academic letter of recommendation is required. Download the BLISS Recommender Instructions belowSend your recommender the instructions, which will guide recommenders on the topics we would like addressed in their letter of recommendation. 


ACADEMIC LETTER: Your academic letter of recommendation should be written by someone in the Harvard academic/research community who can comment on your academic initiative and interest in pursuing excellence. This letter should include brief examples of how you will benefit from and contribute to the BLISS community. If your academic recommender is also a BLISS project mentor, s/he should comment on your qualifications for BLISS generally, as well as your qualifications for his/her specific project. Freshmen may consider a high-school academic/research recommender.

HOUSE RECOMMENDATIONS: Applicants do NOT need to seek a residential letter of recommendation. House feedback will be solicited directly from URAF for all Harvard Summer Undergraduate Research Village (PRISE, BLISS, PRIMO, SHARP, and SURGH) applicants. If you have a community-based reference who is not in your House community (e.g., coach), please contact your House Fellowship Advisor (HFA) so that they can be in touch with that individual to get feedback for your application.

To download the BLISS Recommender Instructions, please click the button below.



IMPORTANT: You should enter your recommender in CARAT before starting any other application materials. Make sure you provide plenty of time for your recommender to ensure your application is completed by the deadline. Do NOT wait until the night before the application is due to send the reference request from CARAT.

               INPUTING YOUR RECOMMENDER IN CARAT

  • HARVARD RECOMMENDER: Start by typing in your recommender's last name; you will then see autocomplete options. Select your recommender from the drop down choices. Click "Save Changes" at the bottom of the page. Click "Send reference request to" button that appears after you clicked save changes. 
  • NON-HARVARD RECOMMENDER: Enter your recommender's name, title, affiliation (University, Institution, or School), and email address. Click "Save Changes" at the bottom of the page. Click "Send reference request to" button that appears after you clicked save changes. 
     

STEP 3:  PREPARE YOUR MATERIALS

BLISS APPLICATION SUPPLEMENT 

Complete the BLISS application supplement form, with concise answers to the eligibility questions. Save the completed form with your information in pdf format.


To download the BLISS Application Supplement Form, please click the button below. 


ESSAY RESPONSES 

Prepare a single document with your responses to the essay prompts on the application supplement and convert to pdf format to upload in CARAT.

RESUME 

Save a resume that includes your work history and a description of your scholarly and extracurricular activities in pdf format.

CURRENT TRANSCRIPT 

Obtain a copy of your latest online unofficial transcript (NOT the S-REC), including your fall course grades to upload in CARAT. To access your unofficial transcript, login to my.harvard.edu. Select Student Home at the top of the page. Under Grades, select View Unofficial Transcript. In the Academic Institution drop down menu, select Harvard University. In the Report Type drop down menu, select Harvard College. Click View Report. Your Unofficial Transcript will open (make sure you have pop-ups enabled). Download and save in pdf format. 

WAIVER FORM  

Complete one waiver form for your academic recommender. Simply upload it completed with your application--do not give it to your recommender. Please note: At the time you make your request for a recommendation, you must disclose to the letter writer your intention to waive or not waive your right to view the letter.  You do not need to submit a waiver for your House/dorm.  (URAF will correspond with residential staff directly; those evaluations are automatically confidential.)

To download the Waiver Form, please click the button below.
 


 

STEP 4:  SUBMIT YOUR MATERIALS

Once you have completed the required application components found in the tabs of your funding source application in CARAT, upload and submit your application materials:

  • BLISS Application Supplement Form 
  • Essay Responses 
  • Resume 
  • Current Transcript 
  • Waiver Forms 

 

FAQs

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What does BLISS stand for?

BLISS originally stood for “behavioral laboratory in the social sciences” but we found that this name discouraged non-laboratory-based social science researchers from participating. So, BLISS doesn’t stand for anything at all right now except for the amazing summer experience you might have! (We are looking for alternative program titles that work with the BLISS acronym, however. Feel free to send suggestions to jmsheph@fas.harvard.edu.)

Is the Program limited to applicants concentrating in the social sciences?

No, we accept applications from concentrators in any academic field, and in particular can envision fruitful pairings between social science faculty and students in fields like computer science, applied math, linguistics, statistics, human evolutionary biology, and so forth. However, BLISS applicants in non-social science concentrations must demonstrate how such cross-disciplinary research will contribute to their development as scholars.

Can I apply to BLISS if I have completed advanced coursework or already have undertaken a research experience in the social sciences?

Yes. BLISS has been designed to establish and cultivate a diverse community of scholars in the social sciences. Any Harvard undergraduate is eligible as long s/he is committed to participating in the program and to conducting research in one of the BLISS-affiliated research projects.

Can I apply to BLISS if I'm an engineering concentrator who only has done one semester of social science coursework?

Yes. Any Harvard undergraduate is eligible as long s/he is committed to performing social science research.  Of course, your application would have to elaborate about why you seek this kind of research experience, especially as it relates to the specific project you identify as your primary choice, or how you relate the BLISS experience to your own academic trajectory.

How important is academic achievement?

BLISS seeks to attract all undergraduates who are motivated to pursue social science research during the summer. Students must be in good academic standing and have taken coursework and/or had experience that would prepare them for research. The Program will draw from an academically diverse population. Individuals who have a demonstrated keen interest in the social sciences but have not yet had an opportunity to experience research are encouraged to apply.

Is financial need a factor in selecting BLISS Fellows?

Selection of BLISS Fellows will be need blind. Fellows who are required to accrue savings to satisfy a requirement for financial aid eligibility ("summer savings requirement") will receive a term-bill credit in the amount determined by the Financial Aid Office. Financial aid recipients are encouraged to apply.

What does ". . . who are also interested in community, diversity, and the advancement of women and minority scholars" mean?

One of the goals of BLISS is to generate interest and enthusiasm for the development and preservation of stimulating undergraduate communities in research. Because women and minorities in some social science disciplines are underrepresented by notable margins at the professional level, there is an ongoing interest and commitment in the College to foster substantive and enriching opportunities that inspire these students to pursue their emerging academic and professional goals in those fields. In addition, the Program aspires to identify and assist individuals who may not have the opportunity to explore their research interests because of a need to work during the summer.

Do I have to be in one of those populations to be eligible?

No. The Program is designed to attract any continuing undergraduate who is interested in and can contribute to the principles of diverse community involvement and social science research.

Will BLISS help me get into graduate school?

Clearly, we cannot guarantee that BLISS will have any impact on graduate school admissions. However, BLISS Fellows will benefit from the opportunity to develop an interdisciplinary network of peers, and develop close interaction and working relationships with faculty. Many undergraduates do not have the opportunity to participate in this kind of community until much later in their careers. In addition, prominent faculty will participate in activities with the Fellows throughout the Program and may serve as future mentors.

Where can I do my research and participate in BLISS?

BLISS applicants must apply to one of the faculty-initiated research projects as indicated in the "Project Descriptions" section of this web site.  Applicants will be given the opportunity to make a first, second, and third choice.  To the extent possible, individuals selected to participate in BLISS will be paired with their first-choice preferences.

Are there any limitations to the kind of research I can do and still be eligible for BLISS?

You may only participate in one of the BLISS-designated research projects.

Can I get housing but not participate in the evening activities?

No. Since a key component of BLISS is contribution to the community and professional development, participants must be willing and available to attend enrichment activities and events during non-research work hours.

May I live off-campus?

No. All participants will live together in one of the River Houses.

Instead of the meals offered at Leverett House, could I get a stipend and cook myself?

Unfortunately, no.  Due to existing programs and refurbishing activities across campus during the summer, the Program is limited to the facilities of the residential house of the Summer Undergraduate Research Village. Please also note that weekend meals are not included in BLISS and very limited cooking facilities are available in the residential facilities.

Does the Program pay for health insurance?

As a continuing Harvard College undergraduate, you are covered by your regular Harvard health insurance during the summer.

I am planning to travel during the month of August. Could I miss the last two weeks of BLISS

No. Individuals who are selected for BLISS must commit to the entire ten-week Program.
 

Overview



The Program for Research in Markets and Organizations (PRIMO) is a 10-week summer program that aims to build community and stimulate creativity among Harvard undergraduate researchers in business and related fields. To participate in PRIMO, you must apply and be selected to work on one of the pre-designated PRIMO research projects which span diverse topics (finance, organizational behavior, marketing, etc.), disciplines (Psychology, Economics, Sociology), as well as methods (quantitative or qualitative). Selected fellows work on projects with faculty at Harvard Business School and get to live with other summer researchers in one of the Harvard College houses and participate in extremely rich evening programming (that includes both social and academic activities). In addition to receiving free lodging and being members of a diverse, vibrant intellectual and social community, fellows also receive a nominal stipend, partial board, and (for those students on financial aid) full coverage of summer saving obligation.

Overview



The Program for Research in Science and Engineering (PRISE) is a 10-week summer program that aims to build community and stimulate creativity among Harvard undergraduate researchers in the life, physical/natural, engineering and applied sciences. To participate in PRISE, you must find a research position on your own, and apply to PRISE separately. (NOTE: it is not necessary to have secured a research position by the PRISE application deadline). Selected fellows work on projects with Harvard-affiliated researchers and get to live with other PRISE fellows in one of the Harvard College houses and participate in extremely rich evening programming (that includes both social and academic activities). In addition to receiving free lodging and being members of a diverse, vibrant intellectual and social community, fellows also receive a nominal stipend, partial board, and (for those students on financial aid) full coverage of summer saving obligation.

Program Details

ABOUT PRISE

The Program tentatively will run from June 5-August 11, 2017, and offers PRISE Fellows free lodging and a partial board plan. While there typically is no stipend or research funding associated with the Program (individuals with little or no funding will receive a modest living allowance), participants who are financial aid recipients will be eligible to receive awards that compensate for their summer saving obligation.

PRISE participation is open to any continuing undergraduate student who is in good standing and affiliated with a Harvard Faculty sponsored laboratory, regardless of whether or not they are funded for their summer research by the lab or a research-sponsoring program (such as Herchel Smith, Stem Cell Institute, etc.). Students who are in laboratories for the summer to gain research experience with Harvard Faculty but are not being paid are eligible to apply.

 

BENEFITS

PRISE offers a variety of benefits to ensure a successful summer research experience and enable fellows to form a close-knit community:

  • Free lodging in designated Harvard housing
  • A partial boarding plan (dining)
  • For financial aid recipients: a term-bill credit fully covering the amount of the student's Summer Savings obligation as determined by the Financial Aid Office 

COMPONENTS & EXPECTATIONS

PRISE Fellows are expected to fully participate and contribute to the community of scholars in evening enrichment activities not associated with individual lab research throughout the term of the Program. While many activities are voluntary, other PRISE activities, especially those associated with Harvard faculty are mandatory for all fellows. Individuals who are taking summer school courses, who are preparing to take the summer MCAT, or who are engaged in full-time public service projects are not eligible to participate in PRISE.

PRISE consists of the following components:

  • Residential life and community: PRISE Fellows will live together in Leverett House for the duration of the Program. PRISE will have on hand its own staff, including the director, resident dean, proctors and program assistants during the ten weeks of the Program.
  • Dining: Essential dining services will be available to PRISE Fellows. Full evening meal service will be available in Dudley House, sometimes in conjunction with evening activities. Breakfast or mid-day meal service will be provided through a debit card usable at any HUDS facility in Cambridge or Longwood.
  • Special Campus-wide Events and Evening ProgramsA special PRISE evening program series featuring prominent scientists in the Harvard community and the Boston area will be open to all Harvard undergraduates. Seminars for PRISE Fellows will include a number of topics specifically designed to augment and enrich their knowledge about scientific research and careers in sciences. Topics such as research ethics, poster presentations, and postgraduate career opportunities will be offered throughout the Program. In addition, Fellows will have the opportunity to practice speaking about their research, in both small and large groups throughout the summer.
  • Recreational and Social ProgramsPRISE Fellows are eligible to register for free use of Harvard athletic facilities, including the Malkin Athletic Center, Hemenway Gymnasium, and Blodgett Pool. A calendar of activities will include a range of opportunities to socialize and take advantage of Boston's cultural and recreational summer offerings with your PRISE colleagues, including a variety of excursions, Red Sox games, and PRISE Fellow-initiated community events.

Eligibility & Selection

ELIGIBILITY

  • Any continuing Harvard College undergraduate student in good standing
  • Must be able to commit 10 weeks* to summer research on campus
  • Must be participating in a research activity in the natural, physical, engineering, or applied sciences with a Harvard Faculty member in relevant academic departments and research centers in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard Medical School, the School of Public Health, affiliated local research institutes and hospitals, and other academic and administrative units throughout the University

*NOTE: Individuals taking summer school courses, preparing for the summer MCAT exam, or engaging in full-time public service projects are not eligible to participate in PRISE.

SELECTION

Since the primary purpose of the Program is to build and foster a strong and diverse community of science scholars, a successful application will demonstrate the following:

  1. A strong dedication to developing or furthering academic interest and excellence in scientific research;
  2. A documented and verified opportunity to participate in a laboratory or other active research experience that fulfills a compelling and specific academic goal over the summer (confirmation may be submitted after the deadline);
  3. The ability and desire to participate actively and enthusiastically in a diverse residential community of scholars;
  4. An academic record demonstrating success in coursework that develops theoretical knowledge and/or practical application of scientific principles (in course labs);

Evaluation of the applicant will be based on how well and how effectively the components of the application define and address these qualities and requirements.

Application - Deadline February 14, 2017

PRISE APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

The deadline for receipt of COMPLETE application materials is 5:00pm EST, February 14, 2017.  INCOMPLETE OR LATE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED.

____________________________________________________________________________

STEP 1:  SOLICIT RECOMMENDER 

One academic letter of recommendation is required. Download the PRISE Recommender Instructions belowSend your recommender the instructions, which will guide recommenders on the topics we would like addressed in their letter of recommendation.

ACADEMIC LETTER: Your academic letter of recommendation should be written by someone in the Harvard academic/research community who can comment on your academic initiative and interest in pursuing excellence. This letter should include brief examples of how you will benefit from PRISE. If your academic recommender is also your summer faculty research host, he/she also should confirm your lab placement in that letter; in this case, the letter of recommendation will also count as a letter of support, and therefore you do not need a separate letter of support. Freshmen may consider a high-school academic/research recommender.

HOUSE RECOMMENDATIONS: Applicants do NOT need to seek a residential letter of recommendation. House feedback will be solicited directly from URAF for all Harvard Summer Undergraduate Research Village (PRISE, BLISS, PRIMO, SHARP, and SURGH) applicants. If you have a community-based reference who is not in your House community (e.g., coach), please contact your House Fellowship Advisor (HFA) so that they can be in touch with that individual to get feedback for your application.

To download the PRISE Recommender Instructions, please click the button below.


IMPORTANT: You should enter your recommender in CARAT before starting any other application materials. Make sure you provide plenty of time for your recommender to ensure your application is completed by the deadline. Do NOT wait until the night before the application is due to send the reference request from CARAT.
INPUTTING YOUR RECOMMENDER IN CARAT

  • HARVARD RECOMMENDER: Start by typing in your recommender's last name; you will then see autocomplete options. Select your recommender from the drop down choices. Click "Save Changes" at the bottom of the page. Click "Send reference request to" button that appears after you clicked save changes. 
  • NON-HARVARD RECOMMENDER: Enter your recommender's name, title, affiliation (University, Institution, or School), and email address. Click "Save Changes" at the bottom of the page. Click "Send reference request to" button that appears after you clicked save changes. 


STEP 2:  PREPARE YOUR MATERIALS

PRISE APPLICATION SUPPLEMENT 
Complete the PRISE application supplement form, with concise answers to the eligibility questions. Save the completed form with your information in pdf format. 

To download the PRISE Application Supplement Form, please click the button below.

ESSAY RESPONSES 
Prepare a single document with your responses to the two essay prompts on the application supplement and save in pdf format. 

RESUME 
Save a resume that includes your work history and a description of your scholarly and extracurricular activities in pdf format.

CURRENT TRANSCRIPT 
Obtain a copy of your latest online unofficial transcript (NOT the S-REC), including your fall course grades to upload in CARAT. To access your unofficial transcript, login to my.harvard.edu. Select Student Home at the top of the page. Under Grades, select View Unofficial Transcript. In the Academic Institution drop down menu, select Harvard University. In the Report Type drop down menu, select Harvard College. Click View Report. Your Unofficial Transcript will open (make sure you have pop-ups enabled). Download and save in pdf format.

WAIVER FORM 
Complete one waiver form for your academic recommender. Simply upload it completed with your application--do not give it to your recommender. Please note: At the time you make your request for a recommendation, you must disclose to the letter writer your intention to waive or not waive your right to view the letter.  You do not need to submit a waiver for your House/dorm.  (URAF will correspond with residential staff directly; those evaluations are automatically confidential.)

To download the Waiver Form, please click the button below.

STEP 3:  CONFIRMATION LETTER

CONFIRMATION LETTER FROM HOST LABORATORY 
A letter from your designated research principal investigator must confirm your placement in the lab, provide details about the proposed project, as well as to what extent and by whom you will be mentored.

Once your host laboratory is confirmed, the faculty host should email their confirmation letter in pdf format to undergradresearch@fas.harvard.edu with PRISE and [YOUR LAST NAME] in the subject line. If you do not have your host laboratory confirmed by the application deadline, please have your faculty host email their confirmation letter as soon as possible.

If your faculty host is also your academic recommender, your faculty host should confirm your lab placement in their letter of recommendation, which they will upload directly to CARAT on your behalf after you indicate them in the Reference section.

STEP 4:  SUBMIT YOUR MATERIALS


Once you have completed the required application components found in the tabs of your funding source application in CARAT, upload and submit your application materials:

  • PRISE Application Supplement Form 
  • Essay Responses
  • Resume 
  • Current Transcript 
  • Waiver Forms 

FAQs

What does PRISE stand for?

PRISE stands for the Program for Research in Science and Engineering.

Why is the Program being offered?

PRISE has been developed in response to the May 2005 report of the Task Force on Women in Science and Engineering (WISE), which recommended the development of a summer residential community for undergraduate scholars in the sciences.

This popular Program has been designed to enable motivated undergraduates to pursue summer research and also participate in a social network that will enhance the experience.

Who is eligible for PRISE?

Any continuing Harvard undergraduate (current freshmen, sophomores, and juniors) in good standing conducting research with Harvard-affiliated Faculty over the summer in the Cambridge-Boston-Longwood area is eligible to apply for the Program.

Does this mean anyone?

Yes, as long as the applicant is in good standing in the College.

Is the Program limited to specific concentrations?

No, applicants may be enrolled in any concentration. However, the Program is designed to cultivate a community of science scholars; thus, applicants in non-science concentrations must demonstrate how the research activity they are engaged in will contribute to their development as a scientist. The research fields for PRISE are limited to the life, physical, engineering, and applied sciences.

Can I apply to PRISE if I'm a Biology concentrator who's also completed two years of coursework in science?

Yes. PRISE has been designed to cultivate a community of scholars in the sciences. Any Harvard undergraduate is eligible as long s/he is committed to performing summer research with a Harvard-affiliated laboratory in the life, physical, engineering, or applied sciences.

Can I apply to PRISE if I'm a humanities concentrator who's only done one semester of science coursework?

Yes. Any Harvard undergraduate is eligible as long s/he is committed to performing summer research with a Harvard-affiliated laboratory in the life, physical, engineering, or applied sciences.

However, archival research, clinical activities, and technical laboratory assistance are not considered significant laboratory research for the purposes of this Program.

How important is academic achievement?

PRISE seeks to attract all undergraduates who are motivated to pursue scientific research during the summer.

The only specific criteria with respect to academic achievement are good academic standing and coursework and/or experience that would prepare one for research. The Program will include an academically diverse population. Individuals who have a demonstrated keen interest in the sciences but have not yet had an opportunity to experience laboratory research are encouraged to apply. That is also true of students undertaking a research project for their senior honors thesis.

Is financial need a factor in selecting PRISE Fellows?

Selection of PRISE Fellows will be need blind. Fellows who are required to accrue savings to satisfy a requirement for financial aid eligibility ("summer savings requirement") will receive a PRISE award supplement in the amount determined by the Financial Aid Office. Financial aid recipients are encouraged to apply.

What is the selection committee looking for?

Since a primary goal of PRISE is to develop a diverse residential community of undergraduate scientists, the selection committee is looking for individuals who are likely to contribute and gain from participation in such a community. Selection will be based on applicant responses to the essay questions and comments in letters of reference that the applicant is strongly suited for a successful summer enrichment experience.

What does ". . . who are also interested in community, diversity, and the advancement of women and minority scholars" mean?

One of the goals of PRISE is to generate interest and enthusiasm for the development and preservation of stimulating undergraduate communities in scientific research. Because women and minorities in many scientific disciplines are comparatively underrepresented by significant margins, both in undergraduate populations and beyond, there is an ongoing interest and commitment in the College to foster substantive and enriching opportunities that inspire these students to pursue their emerging professional goals in science fields. In addition, the Program aspires to identify and assist individuals who may not have the opportunity to explore their scientific research interests because of a need to work during the summer.

Do I have to be in one of those populations to be eligible?

No. The Program is designed to attract any continuing undergraduate scientist who is interested in and can contribute to the principles of diverse community involvement.

What are the benefits of participating in PRISE?

PRISE is an emerging, prestigious program, and the next cohort of PRISE Fellows will be a part of the College's high-profile initiative to support undergraduate research..

In addition to free housing and meals for a 10-week portion of the summer, PRISE will be beneficial in a number of ways:

  • The residential community of science scholars will allow Fellows to cultivate an interdisciplinary network of peers with whom they can communicate and collaborate outside the laboratory environment. Many undergraduates do not have the opportunity to participate in this kind of science community until much later in their careers.
  • The Program will allow Fellows to delve into topical and critical aspects of becoming a scientist through evening seminars and activities.
  • The Program will foster and encourage Fellows to explore the many exciting pathways and professional opportunities open to those considering a career in the frontiers of science.

Will PRISE help me get in to Med School?

Obviously, we cannot guarantee that PRISE will have any impact on any graduate school admissions panel. However, PRISE wis a high-profile program that supports summer research, and PRISE Fellows will benefit from the opportunity to develop an interdisciplinary network of peers. Many undergraduates do not have the opportunity to participate in this kind of science community until much later in their careers. In addition, prominent scientists will participate in activities with the Fellows throughout the Program.

Where can I do my research and still participate in PRISE?

Any laboratory in which a Fellow will be conducting meaningful scientific activity overseen by a Harvard Faculty member on the Cambridge campus or research institutes, or in one of the Boston area hospitals or research institutes is suitable. The key is not the lab location but the promise of oversight and mentorship by a Harvard Faculty sponsor.

Are there any limitations to the kind of research I can do and still be eligible for PRISE?

The PRISE participant must be engaged in a laboratory activity that supports scientific research in the life, physical, applied or engineering sciences. Archival research, clinical activities, and technical laboratory assistance are not considered significant laboratory research for the purposes of this Program.

Can I get housing but not participate in the evening activities?

No. Since a key component of the Program is contribution to the community and professional development, participants must be willing and available to attend enrichment activities and events during non-laboratory work hours.

May I live off-campus?

No. All participants will live together in the Harvard Summer Undergraduate Research Village (River House TBA), along with the participants in BLISS (the Behavioral Laboratory for the Social Sciences, PRIMO (the Program for Research in Markets and Organizations), SHARP (the Summer Humanities and Arts Research Program), and SURGH (Summer Undergraduate Research in Global Health).

Instead of the meals offered through the Harvard Summer Undergraduate Research Village (River House TBA), could I get a stipend and cook myself?

Unfortunately, no. Due to existing programs and refurbishing activities across campus during the summer, the Program is limited to the facilities of the residential house of the Summer Undergraduate Research Village. Please also note that weekend meals are not included in the Program and very limited cooking facilities are available in the residential facilities.

Is this research funding?

No. This is participation in a residential community of scientists.

If I participate in PRISE, may I also get a grant or other award?

Yes, absolutely. Individuals who apply to PRISE are encouraged to seek funding for their independent research activities through one of the College's funding mechanisms, such as the Herchel Smith Summer Undergraduate Science Research Program, funding options available through concentration offices, and other programs. In addition, individuals who are working on a significant laboratory project under the direction of Harvard Faculty but are not being paid are also eligible. You may learn that your application for PRISE has been approved before you receive funding. You need only to verify that you have received a commitment from a Harvard Faculty member to oversee and mentor your research activity for the duration of PRISE.

Does the Program pay for health insurance?

As a continuing Harvard College undergraduate, you are covered by your regular Harvard health insurance during the summer.

I am planning to travel during the month of August. Could I miss the last two weeks of the Program?

No. Individuals who are selected for PRISE must commit to the entire ten-week Program.

Is there a strategy for choosing my reference?

One letter of recommendation is required for PRISE.

The letter of recommendation should be written by someone in the Harvard community who can comment on character, initiative, and interest in pursuing excellence. This letter should include brief but noteworthy examples demonstrating that the applicant will benefit from participation in and contribute to PRISE activities. Freshmen may consider obtaining a letter from someone who knows them well academically or in a research context from before their arrival at Harvard.

One confirmation letter is required for PRISE.  

The confirmation letter is a statement of commitment from your Harvard Faculty laboratory sponsor. This letter should include information about your planned project, and should include an indication of the extent to which the sponsor will be involved in overseeing and mentoring the applicant. (Please note: this letter does not have to be submitted by the PRISE application deadline.)

 

 

How does the application cycle work?

Application instructions are available beginning in mid-December. Complete applications are submitted via the Centralized Application for Research and Travel (CARAT), before 5:00 p.m. on February 14, 2017. (Please see the "Application" section for details and instructions.) The selection process will conclude by the second week of March and applicants will be notified of results before the beginning of April. After an applicant has been selected, s/he must re-verify that her/his research opportunity with a Harvard Faculty member has been secured, and commit to the schedule and activities for the duration of PRISE.

Archives

Overview

 

 

The Summer Humanities and Arts Research Program (SHARP) is a 10-week immersive summer program that aims to build community and stimulate creativity among a small cohort of Harvard undergraduate researchers in the humanities and arts. SHARP fellows work on research projects with Harvard-affiliated faculty, esearchers, and senior library and museum staff. Fellows live together in one of the Harvard College houses and participate in rich evening programming that includes both social and academic activities. To participate in SHARP, you must apply and be selected to work on one of the available SHARP research projects.

 

Program Details

ABOUT SHARP 

The Summer Humanities and Arts Research Program (SHARP) was launched in summer 2013 with the support of the Dean of Arts and Humanities in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the Dean of Harvard College. SHARP provides students with diverse research opportunities across the arts and humanities in an exciting range of research settings. SHARP fellows contribute to the rich, interdisciplinary intellectual, social, and residential environment in activities that include roundtable lunch talks with distinguished faculty speakers, pre-professional seminars, and opportunities to explore Harvard and the New England region more broadly.

BENEFITS

SHARP offers a variety of benefits to ensure a successful summer research experience and enable fellows to form a close-knit community:

  • Free lodging in designated Harvard housing
  • A partial boarding plan (dining)
  • $2500 stipend for the 10-week program (plus an additional meals supplement)
  • For financial aid recipients: a term-bill credit fully covering the amount of the student's Summer Savings obligation as determined by the Financial Aid Office 

COMPONENTS & EXPECTATIONS

Program benefit and financial support are meant to enable SHARP fellows to form a close-knit residential community. Therefore, SHARP Fellows are expected to participate and contribute to the community of scholars in evening enrichment activities throughout the term of the Program. While many activities are voluntary, other SHARP activities, especially those associated with Harvard faculty, are required for all Fellows.  

More specifically, SHARP consists of the following components:

  • Research experience: The intent of the program is to provide a formative and substantive research experience over ten weeks of the summer, working on a project designed by specified Harvard faculty or in collaboration with partnering libraries and museums. Prospective participants will select preferences from an array of SHARP-designated research projects on the application. Selected participants will be matched with a research project.
  • Residential life and community: SHARP Fellows will live together in one of the River Houses for the duration of the Program. Dining: Weekday evening meal service will be available in Dudley House.
  • Special Campus-wide Events and Evening Programs: Special evening programming featuring prominent researchers and scientists in the Harvard community and the Boston area will be open to all Harvard undergraduates. Seminars for SHARP Fellows will include a number of topics specifically designed to augment and enrich their knowledge about research and careers in academia. Topics such as research ethics, poster presentations, and post-graduate career opportunities will be offered throughout the Program. In addition, Fellows will have the opportunity to practice speaking about their research, in both small and large groups throughout the summer.
  • Recreational and Social Programs: SHARP Fellows are eligible to register for free use of Harvard athletic facilities (including the Malkin Athletic Center, Hemenway Gymnasium, and Blodgett Pool). A calendar of activities will include a range of opportunities to socialize and take advantage of Boston's cultural and recreational summer offerings, including a variety of excursions, Red Sox games, and Fellow-initiated community events sponsored by URAF for the College-affiliated research programs.

 

Summer 2017 Projects: SHARP-PEM (Peabody Essex Museum) Deadline Extension 3/24

SHARP-Peabody Essex Museum Partnership (Bailly, Rodley) APPLY BY 3/24

Project Contact: Hannah Swartz, PEM New Initiatives Manager

SHARP-PEM Fellowship
The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) and SHARP are partnering to provide a 10-week summer immersion experience to two Harvard undergraduates seeking a formative experience in humanities or arts-based research. This unique opportunity enables two selected candidates to participate in a project that is meaningful to both PEM and the student. Summer researchers will have access to PEM’s staff, resources, and unique collection; learn what it is like to work within an organization of PEM’s scale and focus; participate in onsite and offsite field trips to learn more about the museum field; network with academic colleagues and peers from across disciplines, as well as other PEM and Harvard College interns and fellows; build skills in creative thinking, project management, teamwork and leadership. This is a rare opportunity for both research and professional development.

Project #1: Build a Network: New England Women Artists at the Peabody Essex Museum
Project Supervisor: Austen Barron Bailly, The George Putnam Curator of American Art

Goal of the project: Through research and documentation, develop a strong understanding of the opportunities, accomplishments, and impact of women artists active in New England between 1830 and 1960 and their art. Research and reports on the women artists and the paintings in PEM's historical American art collection will directly inform the forthcoming total reinstallation and reinterpretation of the American art galleries at PEM.

Thanks to recent gifts to the museum, PEM has added works by a dozen female artists working professionally in New England in the early twentieth century to its core collection in the last 2 years. These talented women forged careers as artists and teachers but remain little known. The SHARP fellow will have the opportunity to research and document the art and lives of these women artists and in so doing contribute to new scholarship exploring New England’s role in fostering professional networks and activities of women artists.

Basic project structure:
  • Develop bibliographic and biographical research for all historical women artists in the collection
  • Create annotated bibliographies of key texts / relevancies and points of connection to objects and artists of study
  • Research and document the role of New England artists’ organizations, schools, professional societies, and exhibitions in supporting the training and careers of women artists
  • Conduct art historical research and interpretation of works by women artists in the collection
  • Prepare summary reports of research
  • Write label texts for select objects for use online or in gallery

Project #2: Storytelling and Interpretation through Integrated Media
Project Supervisor: Ed Rodley, Associate Director of Integrated Media

This fellowship is a hands-on learning experience geared towards students who want to see how digital media integrate into the museum content development process. The SHARP Fellow will work with the Integrated Media (IM) team to re-imagine how we tell meaningful stories with our digital collections. The Fellow will work closely with the IM team, curators, and other PEM staff to create imaginative experiences around museum content and services. Particular emphasis may be paid to existing platform partners like Wikipedia, Google Cultural Institute, YouTube, and Social Media platforms to seed new content.

The Fellow will collaborate in the creative and technical aspects of making digital media pieces, interface with other departments, and assist in keeping multiple IM projects on track. Potential projects include: Wikipedia edit-a-thons and image donations, Google Art Project exhibits and image uploads, and/or social media content initiatives.

SHARP-PEM Qualifications
Candidates must be rising-juniors, rising-seniors or 2017 graduates; interested in museums, history and/or the arts; exhibit analytical thought, strong writing skills, and creativity; willing to work independently and within a team, reporting to a senior staff member; museum work/volunteer experience is not necessarry but preference will be given to students who demonstrate a critical eye toward museums and a genuine interest in the improvement of the museum field.

IMPORTANT Note on the Application Process
Follow the guidelines for applying to SHARP. However, please download and complete the SHARP-PEM Supplemental Form in lieu of the general SHARP supplemental form.  If you are also applying for other SHARP projects, you will need to complete the general SHARP form available in the SHARP application dropdown menu.

Information Session and Tour at the Peabody Essex Museum
The info session will be held on Thursday, February 16, from 4:30-5:30pm, preceding PEM’s monthly after hours PEM/PM party. Please RSVP to Hannah Swartz at hannah_swartz@pem.org to register and receive free admission for the evening.

Visit www.pem.org/visit/pempm for information on the party.

    PEM Background
    The Peabody Essex Museum is America’s oldest continuously operating museum. It was founded in 1799 by some of the country’s earliest, most successful entrepreneurs. During the past twenty years, PEM has been among the fastest growing art museums in North America and the museum is internationally recognized for creativity, innovation, outstanding exhibitions, education programs, publications, and financial management. The Museum’s collections rank among the finest of their kind in several areas and encompass American, Asian, African, Native American, Oceanic, contemporary and maritime art, plus photography and 23 historic properties.

    PEM’s mission is to celebrate art, culture, and creativity in ways that transform people’s lives. To fulfill this mission, the museum is dedicated to creating new kinds of art and art museum experiences through innovative interpretive ideas and methods based on multiple disciplines including neuroscience, museum visitor research, new technologies, and a variety of other knowledge bases.

    This winter, PEM broke ground on a 40,000 sq. ft. expansion that will add three floors of gallery space, a vaulting atrium, and an outdoor garden.  Over the next five years, the museum plans to reconceive every one of its galleries and reinstall its collection, adding novel spaces devoted to experimentation, meditation and sound. The result will be a museum that emphasizes the interconnectedness of cultures, takes broad views off creativity, and features programming that explores the intersection of art, the humanities and sciences.

      SHARP-Houghton Library Research Proposals (Hardman, Cole)

      Project Supervisors: Emilie Hardman, Research, Instruction, and Digital Initiatives Librarian; Heather Cole, Assistant Curator of Modern Books and Manuscripts; and Houghton colleagues

      Project Overview:

      Houghton Library is pleased to invite Harvard undergraduates to work with our collections in the summer with support of an Undergraduate Fellowship. These competitive fellowships are designed to fully support a summer of work at Houghton, Harvard’s world-class rare books and manuscripts library.

      Houghton is home to the world famous and the almost entirely unknown, the ancient and the contemporary, the enduring and the ephemeral; as a researcher, a practitioner, an experimenter, we want to know what students can do with these materials. During the course of a fellowship, undergraduates work closely with library staff to discover new areas of interest or to delve into ongoing projects. Past fellows created an opera; identified and filled gaps in the literature about the American and British birth control movements; produced a series of podcasts on poetry and the archives; made surprising deiscoveries about the origins of American theater at Harvard; explored the life and works of John James Audubon; and the development of W.V. Quine's philosophical work. We invite proposals for this summer on any topic or discipline supported by our collections. Creative, digital, research, and performance projects are all welcome, as are those we haven't thought of yet.

      The Fellowship supports concentrated work with collection materials at Houghton. Fellows will have the opportunity to be in residence at Houghton Library working in the Reading Room with guidance from staff throughout the summer. A public program showcases fellowship projects in the fall.

      Proposing a Project:

      Applicants should be prepared to describe their proposed research project, including specific information about the Houghton Library materials or kinds of materials the project would make use of. This proposal narrative is limited to approximately 500 words. In the SHARP application, this proposal will be included as your first essay response. 

      To schedule a time to talk with a Houghton Librarian about your project in advance, please use this form. You may also email us at: houghton_library@harvard.edu.

      SHARP Independent Research Proposals

       

      SHARP Independent Research Fellowships

      In addition to the menu of SHARP projects presented by faculty or led by our institutional partners, this year SHARP is inviting students to propose their own independent research projects on topics in the arts and humanities, broadly defined. For SHARP independent research projects, applicants must describe the proposed research project in detail and the scope of the work for the 10-week summer research period, including specific information about the resources and materials to be engaged on campus. Students must also identify a faculty mentor for the research project.  In the SHARP application, your independent project proposal will be included as your first essay response.

      Please note: For students proposing independent research projects, the academic reference letter should, in part, specifically address the project and your preparedness to undertake it. 

      Research Mentor Confirmation Letter

      A brief note from your research mentor is also required, providing details about the proposed project and their involvement over the summer. If your academic recommender is also your summer research mentor, the letter of recommendation can also count as the confirmation, and you do not need to provide a separate mentor letter. 

      When confirmed, the faculty mentor should email their confirmation letter in pdf format to undergradresearch@fas.harvard.edu with SHARP and [YOUR LAST NAME] in the subject line. If you do not have your mentor confirmed by the application deadline, please have them email their confirmation letter as soon as possible.

       

      Excess: Baroque Art and Literature (Burgard)

      Project Supervisor: Peter Burgard, Professor of German

      Project Description

      This summer I am completing a book project — on European Baroque art and architecture and German Baroque literature — that I have worked on for a number of years. Doing so entails reviewing and revising what is already written, with regard both to content (the book’s argument) and structure (the book is performative in its structure, and this requires review and discussion), and incorporating scholarship on Baroque art and literature that has appeared in recent years.

      The summer research project entails collaborating on the project with my guidance and mentoring, being my reader and my critic, including a weekly meeting to discuss all matters pertaining to the book. Your final product will be a report on the current state of scholarship on Baroque art and literature and on how it relates to my theory of the Baroque aesthetic. Your research will be an important contribution to scholarship on one of the most important periods in European cultural history.

      The purpose of the book, Figures of Excess: Toward an Aesthetic of the Baroque, is twofold: first, to set forth an aesthetic of the Baroque, without respect to national boundaries, that accounts for and explains the underlying conceptual tendencies of its various literary, artistic, and architectural productions, and thus the conceptual grounds of their styles and themes. Second, it is my aim to demonstrate what the Baroque is that explains it as well for Italian as for Dutch and Spanish art and for German literature, that is, to set forth an aesthetic of the Baroque that makes use, specifically, of seventeenth-century German literature and thereby incorporates that literature into the general European aesthetic phenomenon called Baroque. In articulating this aesthetic, I focus on the Baroque critique of the devotion to system in the Renaissance and the Baroque subversion of systematic principles of composition in the arts and of systematic thought itself. The means of this critique and subversion is the exploration and performance of excess.

      Project Trajectory

      The book is written in four main parts. Each of the first four weeks will be devoted to a critical reading of one of them, discussion with me, and exploration of the most recent pertinent research. Two weeks following that will be spent on consolidating the results of the discussions and research of the first weeks. The next two weeks will focus on consideration of the structure of the book, and the final two weeks on possible refinements of the choice of illustrations and final editing. This may of course change in response to the work we do together, as we may find some things require more attention than others.

      Learning Outcomes

      Because this project is closer to its end than its beginning, but must also to some extent be started up again, since I haven’t been able to work on it for some time and will have been spending the spring term working my way back into it and completing as much as possible, this fellowship may offer some significantly different scholarly experiences than others. You will work your way into an almost fully articulated book-length argument, engage both intellectually and practically with what I have written, conduct research into scholarship on the various topics addressed in the book. In all this, you will gain experience both in editing and in copy-editing.

      The experience will be one of direct and intense involvement in wide-ranging, comparative, and interdisciplinary scholarship in the Humanities. For Humanities students potentially interested in pursuing further studies, as well as for students with a Senior Thesis somewhere on the horizon, this offers a unique opportunity to experience the life of a scholar in the Humanities — mine and your own.

      Requirements

      1) excellent proficiency in reading German; 2) strong interest in studying literary texts, painting, sculpture, and architecture; 3) some interest in philosophical discourse; 4) some experience in the interpretation of literature and/or art. It is also important to be organized, energetic, and committed to intellectual inquiry in general.

       

       

       

       

      Literati in Middle Period China (Bol)

      Project Supervisor: Peter Bol, Charles H. Carswell Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations

      Project Description:
      This project is aimed at understanding  how Chinese literati reacted to Mongol conquest of China in the 13th century. The Fellow will be using the China Biographical Database to explore changes in social networks as Chinese literati come into contact with Mongols and Central Asians in China.

      This research opportunity is part of the China Biographical Database project. The China Biographical Database is a freely accessible relational database with biographical information on about approximately 400,000 men and women, primarily from the 7th through 19th centuries. With both online and offline versions, the data is meant to be useful for statistical, social network, and spatial analysis as well as serving as a kind of biographical reference. The long term goal of CBDB is systematically to include all significant biographical material from China’s historical record and to make the contents available free of charge, without restriction, for academic use. The database is regularly being enriched and new biographical entries are being created for Tang, Five Dynasties, Liao, Song, Jin, Yuan, Ming and Qing figures.

      The SHARP Fellow will work with faculty, project staff, and collaborators from China, Taiwan and Europe in conducting research on scholarly networks during the Yuan and early Ming dynasties (13th-15th c.). The research uses large amounts of biographical data to explore how scholars established strong local networks across kinship ties and used these networks to establish national connections, thus better to understand the spread of Neo-Confucian moral philosophy and new modes of literary culture during the period of Mongol rule in particular.

      This work will help provide a comparative context for my current project on the formation of literati communities in the southeast during the middle period, the construction of a new definition of “Chinese culture,” and efforts to establish a leading role for literati as the bearers of that culture. The Fellow will have space in the Database project office and will meet with me weekly and with other project staff daily. 

      Project Trajectory:

      Week 1. Fundamentals of database design and database queries
      Week 2. Computational methods for extracting information from text corpora
      Week 3. Social network analysis
      Week 4. Geospatial analysis
      Weeks 5-6. Comparative analysis of Neo-Confucian teacher-student relationships and philosophical publications in three different regions
      Weeks 7-8. Comparative analysis of literary exchanges in three different regions
      Weeks 9-10. Temporal analysis of changing relationships between literati and government

      Learning Outcomes:
      During the course of the project the fellow will learn how to use a variety of historical sources and how to apply fundamental technological and analytic skills of the digital humanities to historical questions.

      Requirements:
      This research requires some ability to read Chinese, preferably literary Chinese. It does not require any technical expertise but the Fellow should want to learn various tools.

      How to Visualize the Romance in a Monastery? (Wang)

       

      Project Supervisor: Eugene Wang, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art

      Project Description

      The goal is to produce a multimedia platform or website that showcases the depth and range of the rich visual, theatrical, and literary culture centered on The Romance of the Western Wing. Alternatively known as the Romance of the Western Chamber, the 13th century Chinese play has ever since remained the most popular comedy of all time in China. At the outset, there is nothing remarkable about the boy-meets-girl plot. What is unusual, however, is that all that is not supposed to happen happens: the young man is not supposed to be distracted from his preparation for the imperial examination; the young woman is not supposed to let her mind wander while mourning for her newly deceased father; romance is not supposed to blossom in a Buddhist monastery. Yet all these happen even when they are not supposed to. So we have the romance in the western wing of the monastery. That is the storyline. The play stands on its head everything one knows about China, supposedly steeped in the straight-laced Confucian ethics and decorum. It has drawn as much ire as admiration. In the end, the fans have won. Not only has the play been repeatedly staged over the centuries, the script has also inspired visualization of all kinds, in the form of paintings, woodblock prints, decoration on ceramic vessels, etc. Illustrated books mixing texts and images suggest a premodern “multi-media” drama-in-print, i.e., a book to be “read” and experienced as a play.

      As soon as we get into the realm of visualization, we realize that the matter is not just about a play. The play inspires paintings, but the paintings don’t simply “illustrate” the play. Playfulness means different things for painters and playwrights. Moreover, something more happens when a painting integrates architecture. There are instances in which a painting maps out the play into architecture. So we have a play set in buildings in a painting—a threefold staging. Complexity is therefore what the project is after. The core issue in the project is to grapple with the interface and connectivity of theater, media, art, visualization, and habits of imagination.

      Project Opportunities and Trajectory

      With the big picture of the complex interface in mind, the project starts with basics. We gather as much as we can the textual and visual materials inspired and generated by the Romance of Western Wing. We sort them out and then try to figure out the best ways of ordering and presenting them on a multimedia platform (website, etc.). Timelines, charts, annotated pictorial compositions and architectural drawings are likely to be in our toolbox. Possibilities of video-game-like AR designs are possible depending on our resources, skill sets, and adventurousness.

      Learning Outcomes and Skills

      Multimedia design thinking is the ultimate goal and skill set to be acquired, honed, and exercised. The biggest challenge and fun stem from the uniqueness of the project. We are dealing with a kind of “data visualization” at a more advanced and humanistic level. While charts and timelines are part of the design and the big picture, more relevant will be the integration of diverse textual materials into architectural and pictorial spaces, in other words, learning how to annotate pictures, and let future students to access the entirety of the coherent world of the Romance of the West Wing—Chinese culture in a nutshell—with ease and intelligibility, to be both educated and entertained.

      Selection Criteria

      I seek SHARP fellows who ideally possess the ability to access and use both Chinese and English materials, and who think sharp, write well, and are well-organized. Some degree of reading knowledge of Chinese is preferred.  Additional skill sets will be appreciated, such as web design, using design apps to create architectural and spatial models, and other data visualization skills.

       

      Poetry In America (New)

       

      Project Supervisor: Elisa New, Powell M. Cabot Professor of American Literature

      Project Description

      I am currently at work on Poetry in America , a multi-platform humanities initiative at Harvard. Poetry in America began as a series of HarvardX modules, and has now expanded to a wide umbrella of multimedia educational initiatives in collaboration with FAS, HGSE, DCE, and WGBH, public television’s preeminent production house. I am currently at work producing a Poetry in America TV series with WGBH, and creating state-of-the-art online course materials and teacher training materials in partnership with HGSE and DCE that connect the reading of poetry with other disciplines across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences.

      Over the last three years, I have shot and produced hundreds of hours of video footage for Poetry in America, filmed on location across the country and beyond, in Boston, New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Vermont, and London. This footage features conversations with distinguished guests including Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Nas, Herbie Hancock, Elena Kagan, Tony Kushner, Eve Ensler, Michael Pollan, Jason Collins, Shane Battier, Billy Collins, John McCain, Cynthia Nixon, Shaquille O’Neal, and more.

      Poetry in America will eventuate in several major outputs: The first, Poetry in America for Teachers, is a series of for-credit professional development graduate courses, developed with the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) to support K-12 classroom teachers. These courses are aligned with educational standards, including the Common Core. Teachers will be able to use this course to strengthen their classroom practice while also developing their careers. This project will also produce classroom-ready video content designed to stimulate and appeal to middle and high school students, thus enabling teachers to bring the content of their professional development directly into the classroom. This project will give teachers the confidence and tools to discuss poetry while also meeting English Language Arts goals and providing teachers with professional development opportunities.

      Second, the TV element of this project, currently entering post-production and airing in 2018, will reach viewers of all backgrounds, who will have a chance to see that poetry is connected to every human activity.

      Finally, other avenues for this content, including the HarvardX massive open online course and short films appearing in The Atlantic, Nautilus, and The Nantucket Project, will provide even more avenues for viewers worldwide to connect to poetry in a way that both entertains and educates.

      Project Opportunities and Trajectory

      In the next 12 months my production team will be drawing on the footage that we have filmed to create materials for Poetry in America for Teachers. The first Poetry in America for Teachers course focused on the urban environment-- courses in the pipeline will focus on the natural world and the arts, respectively. We seek a SHARP fellow to assist with all stages of these projects, from research and development, to production and post-production. Involvement will be suited to the fellow’s interests and skills.

      Learning Outcomes and Skills

      The SHARP fellow will hone close-reading and research skills by helping to locate and select poems for use in the classroom. She/he will become familiar with our library of footage, and become adept at watching, editing, and reviewing educational media, identifying key teaching moments, developing curriculums or assessments tailored to learning outcomes, and assisting in discussion and planning with the Harvard Graduate School of Education, WGBH television, and other educational and media partners. The SHARP fellow will gain a nuanced understanding of copyright law, and assist the Poetry in America team with copyright compliance and rights acquisition.

      Selection Criteria

      The ideal candidate for this SHARP fellowship will be a self-motivated, organized, creative, and energetic undergraduate, preferably a rising junior or senior. The applicant should have some experience in literature, history, and/or the arts, and an interest in the digital humanities, multimedia education, K-12 education, and/or film production. Students with a concentration in VES and a background in video production or web design would be especially well suited for this project, but none of these skills are required and there will be opportunities for learning on the job.

       

      Music and Politics in Exile Journals, 1933-45 (Shreffler)

      Project Supervisor: Anne Shreffler, James Edward Ditson Professor of Music and Affiliate, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures 

      Assisting Librarian: Kerry Masteller, Music Reference and Research Librarian, Eda Kuhn Loeb Music Library (kmastell@fas.harvard.edu)

      Project Description

      I am looking for one, and possibly two, undergraduates to assist in research on political and aesthetic debates in the 1930s and 1940s. This will help me to complete two chapters of my book project, Musical Utopias: Progressive Music and Progressive Politics, about a vital strain of twentieth-century modernist music that was inspired by left-wing ideals. For many years, my research has centered on music and politics in the twentieth century, with a particular emphasis on the political associations of different styles.

      The student(s) will research German-language exile journals and other sources in English (and possibly Italian and French, given the relevant language proficiency) to explore and summarize aesthetic debates about modernism at mid-century, particularly in music. Modern idioms such as expressionism and atonality were viewed as integral to a progressive political vision by many of emigrants, partly in reaction to the condemnation of those styles in the Third Reich. Many of the emigrants were left-wing or Communist, so the fact that modern music was also scorned as “formalist” in the Soviet Union made things complicated. While some, like the Austrian composer Hanns Eisler, actively promoted a socialist vision of musical life, others wanted to preserve the cultural values of a free society above all. The debates were vociferous, because aesthetic questions were inextricably linked with politics and so much was at stake.

      Scattered literally to the four winds after the Nazi seizure of power, leading cultural figures found themselves in Paris, Prague, London, New York, Moscow, or Shanghai. They founded German-language publishing houses, journals and newspapers to create community and provide a public platform for exile opinion. In the pages of Der Aufbau (New York), Das neue Tage-Buch (Paris), Die neue Weltbühne (Prague), Internationale Literatur (Moscow), Die Sammlung (Amsterdam), and many other journals, exiles reported on the news from Nazi Germany, cultivated resistance, and presented an alternative to Fascist cultural politics. Journals devoted specifically to music include Musica Viva (published in Brussels, in four languages), 23 (Vienna), and Der Auftakt (Prague). English-language music journals such as Modern Music and Musical Quarterly provide additional documentation of major international musical events and debates from the 1930s and 1940s.

      The student will carry out original research: searching for the relevant journals, then reading, identifying, and summarizing the material. The end product will include a database of relevant articles, along with prose summaries with information about the journals and authors. Harvard’s libraries contain rare original print runs of many of these periodicals, while others are available on microfilm. Many of these exile journals were short-lived, due to the massively unstable political situation as well as the beginning of the war in 1939. Some hard to find, particularly those published in the Soviet Union. Some are digitized and searchable, while others are not. The student will identify the journals, locate relevant articles, and research the political orientations and background of the journal, the editors, and the authors. We will work with Kerry Masteller, Music Reference and Research Librarian, Eda Kuhn Loeb Music Library, to help with digital searches, locating material, and setting up a RefWorks platform for recording and presenting the data. I have a detailed list of about 40 journals which can serve as a starting point.

      Project trajectory:

      Weeks 1 and 2:

      • reading background literature on music and migration, modernism, and political contexts of the time
      • learning the RefWorks platform and preparing keywords and categories for the database and summaries
      • learning how to use the relevant digital collections
      • starting work with one selected digitized journal: reading, selecting, and writing summaries of the relevant material

      Weeks 3 and 4:

      • For the journal you have selected, find out about its print run, political orientation, the biographies of its editors, and other information you think is relevant. Continue to research and write summaries
      • Choose one journal or newspaper that is not digitized (either hard copy or microfilm), develop strategies for finding information in it.
      • Search publications of the exile presses Querido (Amsterdam) and Éditions du Carrefour (Paris) for relevant titles. As you did with your first selected journal, find out about the background of these presses and their editors.
      • Starting working on journals devoted specifically to music, which include Musica Viva (published in Brussels, in four languages), 23 (Vienna), and Der Auftakt (Prague).

      Weeks 5 and 6:

      • In the American English-language journals Modern Music and Musical Quarterly (both digitized), search for articles by or about immigrants from wartime Europe.
      • Identify some of the official party journals of the German Communist Party (KPD) in exile and look for articles about music or aesthetic debates.
      • Do the same with the official organs of the German Socialist Party (SPD) and other socialist splinter groups, and with a couple of journals aimed at a readership of socialist workers’ choruses, such as the Schweizerische Sänger-Zeitung.

      Weeks 7 and 8:

      • Focus on the aesthetic debates in German-language journals published in Moscow, such as Das Wort and Internationale Literatur. (This includes the “Expressionismus-Debatte” of 1937.)
      • Search the Deutsche Zentral-Zeitung, published in Moscow, for relevant articles.

      Weeks 9 and 10:

      • Focus on literary exile journals such as Neue Deutsche Blätter (Prague), edited by Anna Seghers and others, Maß und Wert (Zürich), edited by Thomas Mann and others), and Die Sammlung (Amsterdam), edited by Klaus Mann and others.
      • Finish up the work, adding missing summaries and background information to the RefWorks database.
      • Prepare a list of “next steps” for future research.

      Learning outcomes: enhanced research skills, familiarity with digital collections of historical material, increased knowledge of music history and of political history before and during World War II, experience reading German texts, mastery of RefWorks (a useful platform for senior thesis bibliographies as well), and practice summarizing articles.

      The student for this project could also use this material to expand her/his own interests.  I will work with the student to develop projects.

      Skills required:  1) Excellent proficiency in reading German 2) Skills in good note taking and written summaries. 3) Musical background would be helpful, although not required.

      A student with reading proficiency in French or Italian could research left-wing newspapers and journals in those languages from the same time period.

       

      metaLAB (at) Harvard: Curricle (Schnapp)

       

      Project Supervisors: Mentored by metaLAB team, incl. Prof Jeffrey Schnapp, Jessica Yurkofsky, Matthew Battles, and  Sarah Newman, and working in collaboration with metaLAB graduate student Robert Roessler.

      Research themes: design, digital humanities, data visualization, interdisciplinarity, and the role of the liberal arts in society

      Project: Curricle. Work includes: design and historical research, user testing, student and alumni interviews, design work (with metaLAB team)
      Curricle is a prototype for a new experience in course selection: a digital platform that gives students powerful tools in data visualization and analytics for browsing, shopping, and selecting courses at Harvard. The platform will enable students to see the broader landscape within which they navigate the curriculum, offering more opportunities for choice and customization. Additionally, it will offer a historical research side for students and scholars to explore and visualize Harvard’s curricula over time.  Curricle's power—and its design challenge—consists in this use of data visualization both to map today's curriculum, and to visualize its historical development in previously unseen ways.  

      Specific role for SHARP fellow

      The SHARP fellow will be involved in a variety of aspects of Curricle's development. This will include: research to ground and contextualize the experience of course selection, including interviewing notable alumni about their curricular choices; design work and implementation (in collaboration with metaLAB team); testing versions of the interface with Harvard students; and archival research into historical curricula at Harvard and Radcliffe. The SHARP fellow will participate in weekly metaLAB and Curricle team meetings, and will have the chance to suggest and develop new paths of inquiry.

      We're seeking an independent and organized student who is interested in furthering his or her experience in working with a beta version of a new technological tool; preference will be shown for a fellow with interests in design, interdisciplinary studies, algorithms, and the history and role of the liberal arts in society. The student will have a chance to contribute meaningfully to this exciting new tool, and to work with a small research lab comprised of designers, coders, artists, and scholars.

       

       

      Critical and Primary Sources in LGBTQ History (Bronski)

       

      Project Supervisor: Michael Bronski, Professor of the Practice in Media and Activism

      Project Description              

      I am editing a four volume collection of the 100 most significant essays on Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) history. It is under contract with Bloomsbury Publishing as part of their Critical and Primary Sources series.The project is global in nature and will encompass multiple countries and cultures, as well as time periods. Bloomsbury’s Critical and Primary Sources series is sold, primarily, to public and university libraries often in the non-western world.

      Much of what is called LGBTQ Studies began in the United States and European countries. Many early germinal essays concerned western themes, incidents, and people. The last four decades has produced a wealth of work from African, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, and South Asian scholars interrogating their own national histories. This new scholarship has placed individual national histories in transnational contexts. These four volumes attempt to balance, and build upon, the older (often western-centered) work and place them in conversation with newer scholarship that broadens both the reach and the political intentionality of LGBTQ history. At the moment, the four volumes are tentatively arranged to cover: Vol 1 – theoretical work; Vol 2 – the pre-modern world; Vol 3 – the modern world; Vol 4 – contemporary political organizing and movements.

      The essays in these four volumes will have been previously published. They will range from the seminal work of Lillian Faderman on female friendships from the early 1970s to Rahul Rao’s contemporary studies of queerness, post-colonialism, and terrorism. This summer’s project, in large part, will be devoted to identifying important, significant works of LGBTQ history and then deciding which, working together, best communicate the fullness and breadth of the field.

      Working with me, a SHARP fellow will research and identify the existing scholarship, read and evaluate it, and place it in conversation with other works. The primary research here consists of finding – using Hollis+ as well as other library tools and archives – published articles; while it is thematically complex, basic research skills are all that are necessary.

      Once the essays are chosen I will write an Introduction to each volume as well as an Introduction to the collection. We will then shift to another research mode and I will need help mapping out, and documenting, the larger themes here as well as shape them into Introductory essays. I will also look to the student to help with conceptualizing, editing, and proof-reading the Introductions. The work is not clerical in nature.

      In the first stage of research the student will draw upon their knowledge and interest of history and sexuality to evaluate, with me, the articles to be chosen. In the second stage of research they will draw upon their research, bibliographic, writing and editing skills to help with the final versions of the Introductions.

      Project Opportunities and Trajectory

      The scope of this project is large but eminently feasible to complete during the ten weeks of the summer break. I will supervise the student’s work and help them to develop their research and evaluation skills as well as how to compare the articles to form a cohesive set of texts. While the student will be doing research on their own, regular communication as well as meeting at least twice a week will help us both with this work.

      Learning Outcomes and Skills

      A student who works on this project will grow in a number of ways. Their basic research and text evaluations skills will be increased and sharpened. It is also a great opportunity for a student to broaden and strengthen their knowledge not only of history (and LGBTQ history in particular), but their understanding of gender, sexuality, critical race, and post-colonial theory. There will be ample opportunity for them to use and expand their writing and editing skills in a professional context. Most important, a student who is interested in perusing a career in the  academia or publishing will learn how a book project is conceptualized, researched, compiled, edited, and delivered to a publisher. There is the potential, if my editor at Bloomsbury is open to it, for the SHARP fellow to interact with the editorial department of the publisher as well.

      Selection Criteria

      Students applying should have an interest, and ideally some reading knowledge of, basic aspects of LGBTQ history and politics, as well as gender and sexuality theory. They must have a desire to engage with these ideas and to be willing to explore them in expansive ways. (The global perspective here will be a learning curve for me as well and some of the learning here will be a joint experience.) Sharp attention to detail in research, note taking, handling of files, necessary communications with the publisher, and overall management of all of the aspects of the project are vital. The most important qualifications – aside from basic writing skills I presume most Harvard students have already – are the ability to engage, be continually curious, and be willing to learn as the research and the project develops.

       

      How Did the Past Taste? (Chaplin, Loren, Schultz & Peabody Museum)

       

      Project Supervisors: Joyce Chaplin, James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History; Diana Loren and Lainie Schultz, Academic Partnerships Department, Peabody Museum

      Project Description

      Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology is one of the oldest and largest anthropology museums in the world. It stewards over 1.2 million objects, comprised of archaeological, ethnological, osteological, and archival materials, as well as prints and photographs. The Peabody Museum engages in, supports, and promotes the study and appreciation of ancient and contemporary peoples from around the world. The Museum collects, preserves, and interprets cultural and related materials and offers unique opportunities for innovative teaching, research, and enrichment at Harvard and with communities worldwide.

      In 2018, the Peabody Museum will mount an exhibition curated by Professor Joyce Chaplin, on the history of food in Cambridge, MA. The exhibition explores how local cuisine became increasingly global through time, highlighting certain events in Harvard’s food history such as the 1766 Butter Rebellion.

      The SHARP fellow will contribute to the shaping of this exhibit through hands-on research of Peabody Museum collections, as well as primary and secondary sources potentially located elsewhere on the Harvard campus. This work may include:

      • A research review of particular objects, collections, or collectors;
      • Identification and exploration of interesting themes related to experiences of cooking and eating in New England;
      • Identification of relevant collections located in other Harvard institutions, such as the Museum of Comparative Zoology, the Harvard Herbaria, University Archives, Houghton and Schlesinger Libraries;
      • Recommendations for the visual display of exhibit themes, suitable to a variety of audiences.

      The fellow will be provided with a research space at the Peabody Museum, and will receive regular guidance and supervision from the Museum’s Academic Partnerships Department. The fellow will additionally meet or Skype once a week with Professor Chaplin, to discuss research progress and future directions.

      Learning Outcomes

      The fellow will enjoy a unique, hands-on experience working with museum collections, while gaining critical skills conducting primary research with non-literary sources. The fellow will learn about the process of exhibit development, and the challenge (and importance) of communicating research through a variety of media to a variety of audiences. The fellow will also receive training in professional museum practices, including object-handling, the use of collections databases, and principles of collections management, conservation, and registration.

      Selection Criteria

      This research must be conducted and conveyed to project supervisors according to rigorous standards of academic scholarship and citation, and must meet the standards of care and attention required of working with museum collections. Most importantly, the fellow chosen for this project must be able to think critically and creatively, to consider what sort of collections could contribute to the exhibit’s narrative and where they may be located; the narratives to which already-located collections can contribute; the suitability of various collections for display; and how to use collections to convey what may be complex ideas to an unknown visiting public.

       

      SHARP-Harvard Art Museums (Martinez, Odo)

       

      Project Supervisors: Jessica Martinez, Director of Academic and Public Programs; David Odo, Director of Student Programs and Research Curator of University Collections Initiatives

      Project Description
      Harvard Art Museums welcomes applications from undergraduates interested in public humanities to spend the summer researching public tour initiatives at the Museums. Students will develop and deliver regularly scheduled tours for visitors; will explore various models for gallery activities and guided visits for groups; and will develop an intensive guide for use by Phillips Brooks House Association groups and other community organizations who are interested in visiting the Harvard Art Museums. This work will include collections research, workshops with Museums staff from curatorial, education, conservation, and other departments, investigation of guided visit programs at peer institutions, outreach to PBHA groups, and the writing and editing of a final community-oriented group visit guide.

      SHARP fellows will conduct their research and writing work in the rich collections of the Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler Museums, newly united in a state-of-the-art facility designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop. Expanded galleries feature works from the ancient world to the present, and from the Americas, Europe, North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Asia.

      Agenda
      SHARP fellows will spend the summer researching and participating in public guided visit programs. Fellows will participate in a rigorous training program with Harvard Art Museums staff to gain knowledge of the Museums’ collections, develop skills in critical thinking, visual analysis, public speaking and leadership. Training will draw on scholarship and practice from multiple fields of knowledge, including curatorial practice, artistic practice, art history, conservation science, social sciences, and other areas.

      In addition to developing and delivering regularly scheduled tours, fellows will investigate multiple frameworks for interacting with groups in the gallery space, with an eye towards creating a model for engaging PBHA and other community-oriented groups on campus. They will create an outreach plan for engaging these groups, and their work will culminate in the writing, editing, and distribution of a complete guide to museum group visits for on-campus public service groups.  

      Outcomes
      Fellows will gain in-depth knowledge of specific objects and collection areas they will research to prepare their tours, as well as general knowledge of museum practice through structured and unstructured learning opportunities with a professional staff of curators, conservators, and technologists. Fellows will also gain a broad understanding of different models for public engagement in museums, as they research peer institutions and participate in gallery activity workshops. Finally, fellows will fully direct the research, writing, and distribution of a museum visit guide aimed at on-campus public service groups. By the end of the program, the fellow should have knowledge of Harvard Art Museums collections, improved research and writing skills, familiarity with different models for public engagement in museums, and experience creating and distributing educational materials for museums.

      Selection criteria
      No art history or museum experience necessary, but an enthusiasm and excitement about the Harvard Art Museums is required. We are seeking students with a welcoming and engaging demeanor and a comfort with public speaking; prior teaching/tutoring experience preferred. Preference given to students involved in Phillips Brooks House Association groups or programming. Please indicate if you are fluent in Spanish, Chinese/Mandarin or American Sign Language.

       

      Eligibility & Selection

      ELIGIBILITY

      • All continuing Harvard College undergraduates (rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors)
      • Students in good academic and disciplinary standing

      SELECTION


      While students in any concentration may apply, preference will be given to strong candidates in humanities and arts disciplines.

      Application - Deadline Extended for SHARP-PEM Program: March 24

      SHARP APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

       

      The deadline for receipt of COMPLETE application materials is 5:00pm EST, February 22, 2017.  INCOMPLETE OR LATE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED.

      _____________________________________________________________________________


      STEP 1:  READ

      Read the SHARP program and Project Descriptions carefully and determine up to two projects in which you’d like to participate.

      STEP 2:  SOLICIT RECOMMENDER

      One academic letter of recommendation is required. Download the SHARP Recommender Instructions belowSend your recommender the instructions, which will guide recommenders on the topics we would like addressed in their letter of recommendation.

      ACADEMIC LETTER: Your academic letter of recommendation should be written by someone in the Harvard academic/research community who can comment on your academic initiative and interest in pursuing excellence. This letter should include brief examples of how you will benefit from and contribute to the SHARP community. If your academic recommender is also a SHARP project mentor, s/he should comment on your qualifications for SHARP generally, as well as your qualifications for his/her specific project. Freshmen may consider a high-school academic/research recommender.

      HOUSE RECOMMENDATIONS: Applicants do NOT need to seek a residential letter of recommendation. House feedback will be solicited directly from URAF for all Harvard Summer Undergraduate Research Village (PRISE, BLISS, PRIMO, SHARP, and SURGH) applicants. If you have a community-based reference who is not in your House community (e.g., coach), please contact your House Fellowship Advisor (HFA) so that they can be in touch with that individual to get feedback for your application.

       

      CONFIRMATION LETTER (for SHARP independent research proposals only): A brief letter from your research mentor is also required, providing details about the proposed project and their involvement over the summer. If your academic recommender is also your summer research mentor, the letter of recommendation can also count as the confirmation, and therefore you do not need a separate letter of confirmation. 

       

      When confirmed, the faculty mentor should email their confirmation letter in pdf format to undergradresearch@fas.harvard.edu with SHARP and [YOUR LAST NAME] in the subject line. If you do not have your mentor confirmed by the application deadline, please have them email their confirmation letter as soon as possible.

       

      To download the SHARP Academic Recommender Instructions, please click the button below.

      IMPORTANT: You should enter your recommender in CARAT before starting any other application materials. Make sure you provide plenty of time for your recommender to ensure your application is completed by the deadline. Do NOT wait until the night before the application is due to send the reference request from CARAT.

      INPUTING YOUR RECOMMENDER IN CARAT

      • HARVARD RECOMMENDER: Start by typing in your recommender's last name; you will then see autocomplete options. Select your recommender from the drop down choices. Click "Save Changes" at the bottom of the page. Click "Send reference request to" button that appears after you clicked save changes. 
      • NON-HARVARD RECOMMENDER: Enter your recommender's name, title, affiliation (University, Institution, or School), and email address. Click "Save Changes" at the bottom of the page. Click "Send reference request to" button that appears after you clicked save changes. 


      STEP 3:  PREPARE YOUR MATERIALS

      SHARP APPLICATION SUPPLEMENT  
      Complete the SHARP application supplement form, with concise answers to the eligibility questions. Save the completed form with your information in pdf format.
      To download the SHARP Application Supplement Form, please click the button below. 


      IMPORTANT: For SHARP-PEM project applications only, please download and submit the SHARP-PEM Supplemental Form in lieu if the above.

      ESSAY RESPONSES 
      Prepare a single document with your responses to the essay prompts on the application supplement, and convert to pdf to upload in CARAT.

      RESUME 
      Save a resume that includes your work history and a description of your scholarly and extracurricular activities in pdf format.

      CURRENT TRANSCRIPT 
      Obtain a copy of your latest online unofficial transcript (NOT the S-REC), including your fall course grades to upload in CARAT. To access your unofficial transcript, login to my.harvard.edu. Select Student Home at the top of the page. Under Grades, select View Unofficial Transcript. In the Academic Institution drop down menu, select Harvard University. In the Report Type drop down menu, select Harvard College. Click View Report. Your Unofficial Transcript will open (make sure you have pop-ups enabled). Download and save in pdf format.

      WAIVER FORM 
      Complete one waiver form for your academic recommender. Simply upload it completed with your application--do not give it to your recommender. Please note: At the time you make your request for a recommendation, you must disclose to the letter writer your intention to waive or not waive your right to view the letter.  You do not need to submit a waiver for your House/dorm.  (URAF will correspond with residential staff directly; those evaluations are automatically confidential.)

      To download the Waiver Form, please click the button below.

      STEP 4:  SUBMIT YOUR MATERIALS

      Once you have completed the required application components found in the tabs of your funding source application in CARAT, upload and submit your application materials:

      • SHARP Application Supplement Form 
      • Essay Responses 
      • Resume
      • Current Transcript 
      • Waiver Forms 

      FAQs

      FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

      What does SHARP stand for?

      SHARP stands for Summer Humanities and Arts Research Program. 

      Is the Program limited to applicants concentrating in the social sciences?

      No, applicants may concentrate in any academic field. However, SHARP is designed to cultivate a community of arts and humanities scholars; thus, applicants in unrelated concentrations must demonstrate how the research activity they expect to be engaged in will contribute to their development as an arts and humanities scholar, as indicated in the selected SHARP-affiliated research projects.

      Can I apply to SHARP if I have completed advanced coursework or already have undertaken a research experience in the social sciences?

      Yes. SHARP has been designed to establish and cultivate a diverse community of scholars in the arts and humanities. Any Harvard undergraduate is eligible as long s/he is committed to participating in the program and to conducting research in one of the SHARP-affiliated research projects.

      Can I apply to SHARP if I'm an engineering concentrator who only has done one semester of humanities coursework?

      Yes. Any Harvard undergraduate is eligible as long s/he is committed to performing arts and humanities research.  Of course, your application would have to elaborate about why you seek this kind of research experience, especially as it relates to the specific project you identify as your primary choice, or how you relate the SHARP experience to your own academic trajectory.

      How important is academic achievement?

      SHARP seeks to attract all undergraduates who are motivated to pursue humanities and arts research during the summer. Students must be in good academic standing and have taken coursework and/or had experience that would prepare them for research. The Program will draw from an academically diverse population. Individuals who have a demonstrated keen interest in the arts and humanities but have not yet had an opportunity to experience research are encouraged to apply.

      Is financial need a factor in selecting SHARP Fellows?

      Selection of SHARP Fellows will be need blind. Fellows who are required to accrue savings to satisfy a requirement for financial aid eligibility ("summer savings requirement") will receive a term-bill credit in the amount determined by the Financial Aid Office. Financial aid recipients are encouraged to apply.

      Will SHARP help me get into graduate school?

      Clearly, we cannot guarantee that SHARP will have any impact on graduate school admissions. However, SHARP Fellows will benefit from the opportunity to develop an interdisciplinary network of peers, and develop close interaction and working relationships with faculty. Many undergraduates do not have the opportunity to participate in this kind of community until much later in their careers. In addition, prominent faculty will participate in activities with the Fellows throughout the Program and may serve as future mentors.

      Where can I do my research and participate in SHARP?

      SHARP applicants must apply to one of the faculty-initiated research projects as indicated in the "Project Descriptions" section of this web site.  Applicants will be given the opportunity to make a first, second, and third choice.  To the extent possible, individuals selected to participate in SHARP will be paired with their first-choice preferences.

      Are there any limitations to the kind of research I can do and still be eligible for SHARP?

      You may only participate in one of the SHARP-designated research projects.

      Can I get housing but not participate in the evening activities?

      No. Since a key component of SHARP is contribution to the community and professional development, participants must be willing and available to attend enrichment activities and events during non-research work hours.

      May I live off-campus?

      No. All participants will live together in one of the River Houses.

      Instead of the meals offered at Leverett House, could I get a stipend and cook myself?

      Unfortunately, no.  Due to existing programs and refurbishing activities across campus during the summer, the Program is limited to the facilities of the residential house of the Summer Undergraduate Research Village. Please also note that weekend meals are not included in SHARP and very limited cooking facilities are available in the residential facilities. 

       Does the Program pay for health insurance?

      As a continuing Harvard College undergraduate, you are covered by your regular Harvard health insurance during the summer.

      I am planning to travel during the month of August. Could I miss the last two weeks of SHARP?

      No. Individuals who are selected for SHARP must commit to the entire ten-week Program.

       

      Past Project Descriptions (2016)

      Project Descriptions 2017.................The list is growing, so check back for more opportunities!

      SHARP-Peabody Essex Museum Partnership (Bailly, Rodley) APPLY BY 3/24

      Project Contact: Hannah Swartz, PEM New Initiatives Manager

      SHARP-PEM Fellowship
      The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) and SHARP are partnering to provide a 10-week summer immersion experience to two Harvard undergraduates seeking a formative experience in humanities or arts-based research. This unique opportunity enables two selected candidates to participate in a project that is meaningful to both PEM and the student. Summer researchers will have access to PEM’s staff, resources, and unique collection; learn what it is like to work within an organization of PEM’s scale and focus; participate in onsite and offsite field trips to learn more about the museum field; network with academic colleagues and peers from across disciplines, as well as other PEM and Harvard College interns and fellows; build skills in creative thinking, project management, teamwork and leadership. This is a rare opportunity for both research and professional development.

      Project #1: Build a Network: New England Women Artists at the Peabody Essex Museum
      Project Supervisor: Austen Barron Bailly, The George Putnam Curator of American Art

      Goal of the project: Through research and documentation, develop a strong understanding of the opportunities, accomplishments, and impact of women artists active in New England between 1830 and 1960 and their art. Research and reports on the women artists and the paintings in PEM's historical American art collection will directly inform the forthcoming total reinstallation and reinterpretation of the American art galleries at PEM.

      Thanks to recent gifts to the museum, PEM has added works by a dozen female artists working professionally in New England in the early twentieth century to its core collection in the last 2 years. These talented women forged careers as artists and teachers but remain little known. The SHARP fellow will have the opportunity to research and document the art and lives of these women artists and in so doing contribute to new scholarship exploring New England’s role in fostering professional networks and activities of women artists.

      Basic project structure:
      • Develop bibliographic and biographical research for all historical women artists in the collection
      • Create annotated bibliographies of key texts / relevancies and points of connection to objects and artists of study
      • Research and document the role of New England artists’ organizations, schools, professional societies, and exhibitions in supporting the training and careers of women artists
      • Conduct art historical research and interpretation of works by women artists in the collection
      • Prepare summary reports of research
      • Write label texts for select objects for use online or in gallery

      Project #2: Storytelling and Interpretation through Integrated Media
      Project Supervisor: Ed Rodley, Associate Director of Integrated Media

      This fellowship is a hands-on learning experience geared towards students who want to see how digital media integrate into the museum content development process. The SHARP Fellow will work with the Integrated Media (IM) team to re-imagine how we tell meaningful stories with our digital collections. The Fellow will work closely with the IM team, curators, and other PEM staff to create imaginative experiences around museum content and services. Particular emphasis may be paid to existing platform partners like Wikipedia, Google Cultural Institute, YouTube, and Social Media platforms to seed new content.

      The Fellow will collaborate in the creative and technical aspects of making digital media pieces, interface with other departments, and assist in keeping multiple IM projects on track. Potential projects include: Wikipedia edit-a-thons and image donations, Google Art Project exhibits and image uploads, and/or social media content initiatives.

      SHARP-PEM Qualifications
      Candidates must be rising-juniors, rising-seniors or 2017 graduates; interested in museums, history and/or the arts; exhibit analytical thought, strong writing skills, and creativity; willing to work independently and within a team, reporting to a senior staff member; museum work/volunteer experience is not necessarry but preference will be given to students who demonstrate a critical eye toward museums and a genuine interest in the improvement of the museum field.

      IMPORTANT Note on the Application Process
      Follow the guidelines for applying to SHARP. However, please download and complete the SHARP-PEM Supplemental Form in lieu of the general SHARP supplemental form.  If you are also applying for other SHARP projects, you will need to complete the general SHARP form available in the SHARP application dropdown menu.

      Information Session and Tour at the Peabody Essex Museum
      The info session will be held on Thursday, February 16, from 4:30-5:30pm, preceding PEM’s monthly after hours PEM/PM party. Please RSVP to Hannah Swartz at hannah_swartz@pem.org to register and receive free admission for the evening.

      Visit www.pem.org/visit/pempm for information on the party.

        PEM Background
        The Peabody Essex Museum is America’s oldest continuously operating museum. It was founded in 1799 by some of the country’s earliest, most successful entrepreneurs. During the past twenty years, PEM has been among the fastest growing art museums in North America and the museum is internationally recognized for creativity, innovation, outstanding exhibitions, education programs, publications, and financial management. The Museum’s collections rank among the finest of their kind in several areas and encompass American, Asian, African, Native American, Oceanic, contemporary and maritime art, plus photography and 23 historic properties.

        PEM’s mission is to celebrate art, culture, and creativity in ways that transform people’s lives. To fulfill this mission, the museum is dedicated to creating new kinds of art and art museum experiences through innovative interpretive ideas and methods based on multiple disciplines including neuroscience, museum visitor research, new technologies, and a variety of other knowledge bases.

        This winter, PEM broke ground on a 40,000 sq. ft. expansion that will add three floors of gallery space, a vaulting atrium, and an outdoor garden.  Over the next five years, the museum plans to reconceive every one of its galleries and reinstall its collection, adding novel spaces devoted to experimentation, meditation and sound. The result will be a museum that emphasizes the interconnectedness of cultures, takes broad views off creativity, and features programming that explores the intersection of art, the humanities and sciences.

          SHARP-Houghton Library Research Proposals (Hardman, Cole)

          Project Supervisors: Emilie Hardman, Research, Instruction, and Digital Initiatives Librarian; Heather Cole, Assistant Curator of Modern Books and Manuscripts; and Houghton colleagues

          Project Overview:

          Houghton Library is pleased to invite Harvard undergraduates to work with our collections in the summer with support of an Undergraduate Fellowship. These competitive fellowships are designed to fully support a summer of work at Houghton, Harvard’s world-class rare books and manuscripts library.

          Houghton is home to the world famous and the almost entirely unknown, the ancient and the contemporary, the enduring and the ephemeral; as a researcher, a practitioner, an experimenter, we want to know what students can do with these materials. During the course of a fellowship, undergraduates work closely with library staff to discover new areas of interest or to delve into ongoing projects. Past fellows created an opera; identified and filled gaps in the literature about the American and British birth control movements; produced a series of podcasts on poetry and the archives; made surprising deiscoveries about the origins of American theater at Harvard; explored the life and works of John James Audubon; and the development of W.V. Quine's philosophical work. We invite proposals for this summer on any topic or discipline supported by our collections. Creative, digital, research, and performance projects are all welcome, as are those we haven't thought of yet.

          The Fellowship supports concentrated work with collection materials at Houghton. Fellows will have the opportunity to be in residence at Houghton Library working in the Reading Room with guidance from staff throughout the summer. A public program showcases fellowship projects in the fall.

          Proposing a Project:

          Applicants should be prepared to describe their proposed research project, including specific information about the Houghton Library materials or kinds of materials the project would make use of. This proposal narrative is limited to approximately 500 words. In the SHARP application, this proposal will be included as your first essay response. 

          To schedule a time to talk with a Houghton Librarian about your project in advance, please use this form. You may also email us at: houghton_library@harvard.edu.

          SHARP Independent Research Proposals

           

          SHARP Independent Research Fellowships

          In addition to the menu of SHARP projects presented by faculty or led by our institutional partners, this year SHARP is inviting students to propose their own independent research projects on topics in the arts and humanities, broadly defined. For SHARP independent research projects, applicants must describe the proposed research project in detail and the scope of the work for the 10-week summer research period, including specific information about the resources and materials to be engaged on campus. Students must also identify a faculty mentor for the research project.  In the SHARP application, your independent project proposal will be included as your first essay response.

          Please note: For students proposing independent research projects, the academic reference letter should, in part, specifically address the project and your preparedness to undertake it. 

          Research Mentor Confirmation Letter

          A brief note from your research mentor is also required, providing details about the proposed project and their involvement over the summer. If your academic recommender is also your summer research mentor, the letter of recommendation can also count as the confirmation, and you do not need to provide a separate mentor letter. 

          When confirmed, the faculty mentor should email their confirmation letter in pdf format to undergradresearch@fas.harvard.edu with SHARP and [YOUR LAST NAME] in the subject line. If you do not have your mentor confirmed by the application deadline, please have them email their confirmation letter as soon as possible.

           

          Excess: Baroque Art and Literature (Burgard)

          Project Supervisor: Peter Burgard, Professor of German

          Project Description

          This summer I am completing a book project — on European Baroque art and architecture and German Baroque literature — that I have worked on for a number of years. Doing so entails reviewing and revising what is already written, with regard both to content (the book’s argument) and structure (the book is performative in its structure, and this requires review and discussion), and incorporating scholarship on Baroque art and literature that has appeared in recent years.

          The summer research project entails collaborating on the project with my guidance and mentoring, being my reader and my critic, including a weekly meeting to discuss all matters pertaining to the book. Your final product will be a report on the current state of scholarship on Baroque art and literature and on how it relates to my theory of the Baroque aesthetic. Your research will be an important contribution to scholarship on one of the most important periods in European cultural history.

          The purpose of the book, Figures of Excess: Toward an Aesthetic of the Baroque, is twofold: first, to set forth an aesthetic of the Baroque, without respect to national boundaries, that accounts for and explains the underlying conceptual tendencies of its various literary, artistic, and architectural productions, and thus the conceptual grounds of their styles and themes. Second, it is my aim to demonstrate what the Baroque is that explains it as well for Italian as for Dutch and Spanish art and for German literature, that is, to set forth an aesthetic of the Baroque that makes use, specifically, of seventeenth-century German literature and thereby incorporates that literature into the general European aesthetic phenomenon called Baroque. In articulating this aesthetic, I focus on the Baroque critique of the devotion to system in the Renaissance and the Baroque subversion of systematic principles of composition in the arts and of systematic thought itself. The means of this critique and subversion is the exploration and performance of excess.

          Project Trajectory

          The book is written in four main parts. Each of the first four weeks will be devoted to a critical reading of one of them, discussion with me, and exploration of the most recent pertinent research. Two weeks following that will be spent on consolidating the results of the discussions and research of the first weeks. The next two weeks will focus on consideration of the structure of the book, and the final two weeks on possible refinements of the choice of illustrations and final editing. This may of course change in response to the work we do together, as we may find some things require more attention than others.

          Learning Outcomes

          Because this project is closer to its end than its beginning, but must also to some extent be started up again, since I haven’t been able to work on it for some time and will have been spending the spring term working my way back into it and completing as much as possible, this fellowship may offer some significantly different scholarly experiences than others. You will work your way into an almost fully articulated book-length argument, engage both intellectually and practically with what I have written, conduct research into scholarship on the various topics addressed in the book. In all this, you will gain experience both in editing and in copy-editing.

          The experience will be one of direct and intense involvement in wide-ranging, comparative, and interdisciplinary scholarship in the Humanities. For Humanities students potentially interested in pursuing further studies, as well as for students with a Senior Thesis somewhere on the horizon, this offers a unique opportunity to experience the life of a scholar in the Humanities — mine and your own.

          Requirements

          1) excellent proficiency in reading German; 2) strong interest in studying literary texts, painting, sculpture, and architecture; 3) some interest in philosophical discourse; 4) some experience in the interpretation of literature and/or art. It is also important to be organized, energetic, and committed to intellectual inquiry in general.

           

           

           

           

          Literati in Middle Period China (Bol)

          Project Supervisor: Peter Bol, Charles H. Carswell Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations

          Project Description:
          This project is aimed at understanding  how Chinese literati reacted to Mongol conquest of China in the 13th century. The Fellow will be using the China Biographical Database to explore changes in social networks as Chinese literati come into contact with Mongols and Central Asians in China.

          This research opportunity is part of the China Biographical Database project. The China Biographical Database is a freely accessible relational database with biographical information on about approximately 400,000 men and women, primarily from the 7th through 19th centuries. With both online and offline versions, the data is meant to be useful for statistical, social network, and spatial analysis as well as serving as a kind of biographical reference. The long term goal of CBDB is systematically to include all significant biographical material from China’s historical record and to make the contents available free of charge, without restriction, for academic use. The database is regularly being enriched and new biographical entries are being created for Tang, Five Dynasties, Liao, Song, Jin, Yuan, Ming and Qing figures.

          The SHARP Fellow will work with faculty, project staff, and collaborators from China, Taiwan and Europe in conducting research on scholarly networks during the Yuan and early Ming dynasties (13th-15th c.). The research uses large amounts of biographical data to explore how scholars established strong local networks across kinship ties and used these networks to establish national connections, thus better to understand the spread of Neo-Confucian moral philosophy and new modes of literary culture during the period of Mongol rule in particular.

          This work will help provide a comparative context for my current project on the formation of literati communities in the southeast during the middle period, the construction of a new definition of “Chinese culture,” and efforts to establish a leading role for literati as the bearers of that culture. The Fellow will have space in the Database project office and will meet with me weekly and with other project staff daily. 

          Project Trajectory:

          Week 1. Fundamentals of database design and database queries
          Week 2. Computational methods for extracting information from text corpora
          Week 3. Social network analysis
          Week 4. Geospatial analysis
          Weeks 5-6. Comparative analysis of Neo-Confucian teacher-student relationships and philosophical publications in three different regions
          Weeks 7-8. Comparative analysis of literary exchanges in three different regions
          Weeks 9-10. Temporal analysis of changing relationships between literati and government

          Learning Outcomes:
          During the course of the project the fellow will learn how to use a variety of historical sources and how to apply fundamental technological and analytic skills of the digital humanities to historical questions.

          Requirements:
          This research requires some ability to read Chinese, preferably literary Chinese. It does not require any technical expertise but the Fellow should want to learn various tools.

          How to Visualize the Romance in a Monastery? (Wang)

           

          Project Supervisor: Eugene Wang, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art

          Project Description

          The goal is to produce a multimedia platform or website that showcases the depth and range of the rich visual, theatrical, and literary culture centered on The Romance of the Western Wing. Alternatively known as the Romance of the Western Chamber, the 13th century Chinese play has ever since remained the most popular comedy of all time in China. At the outset, there is nothing remarkable about the boy-meets-girl plot. What is unusual, however, is that all that is not supposed to happen happens: the young man is not supposed to be distracted from his preparation for the imperial examination; the young woman is not supposed to let her mind wander while mourning for her newly deceased father; romance is not supposed to blossom in a Buddhist monastery. Yet all these happen even when they are not supposed to. So we have the romance in the western wing of the monastery. That is the storyline. The play stands on its head everything one knows about China, supposedly steeped in the straight-laced Confucian ethics and decorum. It has drawn as much ire as admiration. In the end, the fans have won. Not only has the play been repeatedly staged over the centuries, the script has also inspired visualization of all kinds, in the form of paintings, woodblock prints, decoration on ceramic vessels, etc. Illustrated books mixing texts and images suggest a premodern “multi-media” drama-in-print, i.e., a book to be “read” and experienced as a play.

          As soon as we get into the realm of visualization, we realize that the matter is not just about a play. The play inspires paintings, but the paintings don’t simply “illustrate” the play. Playfulness means different things for painters and playwrights. Moreover, something more happens when a painting integrates architecture. There are instances in which a painting maps out the play into architecture. So we have a play set in buildings in a painting—a threefold staging. Complexity is therefore what the project is after. The core issue in the project is to grapple with the interface and connectivity of theater, media, art, visualization, and habits of imagination.

          Project Opportunities and Trajectory

          With the big picture of the complex interface in mind, the project starts with basics. We gather as much as we can the textual and visual materials inspired and generated by the Romance of Western Wing. We sort them out and then try to figure out the best ways of ordering and presenting them on a multimedia platform (website, etc.). Timelines, charts, annotated pictorial compositions and architectural drawings are likely to be in our toolbox. Possibilities of video-game-like AR designs are possible depending on our resources, skill sets, and adventurousness.

          Learning Outcomes and Skills

          Multimedia design thinking is the ultimate goal and skill set to be acquired, honed, and exercised. The biggest challenge and fun stem from the uniqueness of the project. We are dealing with a kind of “data visualization” at a more advanced and humanistic level. While charts and timelines are part of the design and the big picture, more relevant will be the integration of diverse textual materials into architectural and pictorial spaces, in other words, learning how to annotate pictures, and let future students to access the entirety of the coherent world of the Romance of the West Wing—Chinese culture in a nutshell—with ease and intelligibility, to be both educated and entertained.

          Selection Criteria

          I seek SHARP fellows who ideally possess the ability to access and use both Chinese and English materials, and who think sharp, write well, and are well-organized. Some degree of reading knowledge of Chinese is preferred.  Additional skill sets will be appreciated, such as web design, using design apps to create architectural and spatial models, and other data visualization skills.

           

          Poetry In America (New)

           

          Project Supervisor: Elisa New, Powell M. Cabot Professor of American Literature

          Project Description

          I am currently at work on Poetry in America , a multi-platform humanities initiative at Harvard. Poetry in America began as a series of HarvardX modules, and has now expanded to a wide umbrella of multimedia educational initiatives in collaboration with FAS, HGSE, DCE, and WGBH, public television’s preeminent production house. I am currently at work producing a Poetry in America TV series with WGBH, and creating state-of-the-art online course materials and teacher training materials in partnership with HGSE and DCE that connect the reading of poetry with other disciplines across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences.

          Over the last three years, I have shot and produced hundreds of hours of video footage for Poetry in America, filmed on location across the country and beyond, in Boston, New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Vermont, and London. This footage features conversations with distinguished guests including Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Nas, Herbie Hancock, Elena Kagan, Tony Kushner, Eve Ensler, Michael Pollan, Jason Collins, Shane Battier, Billy Collins, John McCain, Cynthia Nixon, Shaquille O’Neal, and more.

          Poetry in America will eventuate in several major outputs: The first, Poetry in America for Teachers, is a series of for-credit professional development graduate courses, developed with the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) to support K-12 classroom teachers. These courses are aligned with educational standards, including the Common Core. Teachers will be able to use this course to strengthen their classroom practice while also developing their careers. This project will also produce classroom-ready video content designed to stimulate and appeal to middle and high school students, thus enabling teachers to bring the content of their professional development directly into the classroom. This project will give teachers the confidence and tools to discuss poetry while also meeting English Language Arts goals and providing teachers with professional development opportunities.

          Second, the TV element of this project, currently entering post-production and airing in 2018, will reach viewers of all backgrounds, who will have a chance to see that poetry is connected to every human activity.

          Finally, other avenues for this content, including the HarvardX massive open online course and short films appearing in The Atlantic, Nautilus, and The Nantucket Project, will provide even more avenues for viewers worldwide to connect to poetry in a way that both entertains and educates.

          Project Opportunities and Trajectory

          In the next 12 months my production team will be drawing on the footage that we have filmed to create materials for Poetry in America for Teachers. The first Poetry in America for Teachers course focused on the urban environment-- courses in the pipeline will focus on the natural world and the arts, respectively. We seek a SHARP fellow to assist with all stages of these projects, from research and development, to production and post-production. Involvement will be suited to the fellow’s interests and skills.

          Learning Outcomes and Skills

          The SHARP fellow will hone close-reading and research skills by helping to locate and select poems for use in the classroom. She/he will become familiar with our library of footage, and become adept at watching, editing, and reviewing educational media, identifying key teaching moments, developing curriculums or assessments tailored to learning outcomes, and assisting in discussion and planning with the Harvard Graduate School of Education, WGBH television, and other educational and media partners. The SHARP fellow will gain a nuanced understanding of copyright law, and assist the Poetry in America team with copyright compliance and rights acquisition.

          Selection Criteria

          The ideal candidate for this SHARP fellowship will be a self-motivated, organized, creative, and energetic undergraduate, preferably a rising junior or senior. The applicant should have some experience in literature, history, and/or the arts, and an interest in the digital humanities, multimedia education, K-12 education, and/or film production. Students with a concentration in VES and a background in video production or web design would be especially well suited for this project, but none of these skills are required and there will be opportunities for learning on the job.

           

          Music and Politics in Exile Journals, 1933-45 (Shreffler)

          Project Supervisor: Anne Shreffler, James Edward Ditson Professor of Music and Affiliate, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures 

          Assisting Librarian: Kerry Masteller, Music Reference and Research Librarian, Eda Kuhn Loeb Music Library (kmastell@fas.harvard.edu)

          Project Description

          I am looking for one, and possibly two, undergraduates to assist in research on political and aesthetic debates in the 1930s and 1940s. This will help me to complete two chapters of my book project, Musical Utopias: Progressive Music and Progressive Politics, about a vital strain of twentieth-century modernist music that was inspired by left-wing ideals. For many years, my research has centered on music and politics in the twentieth century, with a particular emphasis on the political associations of different styles.

          The student(s) will research German-language exile journals and other sources in English (and possibly Italian and French, given the relevant language proficiency) to explore and summarize aesthetic debates about modernism at mid-century, particularly in music. Modern idioms such as expressionism and atonality were viewed as integral to a progressive political vision by many of emigrants, partly in reaction to the condemnation of those styles in the Third Reich. Many of the emigrants were left-wing or Communist, so the fact that modern music was also scorned as “formalist” in the Soviet Union made things complicated. While some, like the Austrian composer Hanns Eisler, actively promoted a socialist vision of musical life, others wanted to preserve the cultural values of a free society above all. The debates were vociferous, because aesthetic questions were inextricably linked with politics and so much was at stake.

          Scattered literally to the four winds after the Nazi seizure of power, leading cultural figures found themselves in Paris, Prague, London, New York, Moscow, or Shanghai. They founded German-language publishing houses, journals and newspapers to create community and provide a public platform for exile opinion. In the pages of Der Aufbau (New York), Das neue Tage-Buch (Paris), Die neue Weltbühne (Prague), Internationale Literatur (Moscow), Die Sammlung (Amsterdam), and many other journals, exiles reported on the news from Nazi Germany, cultivated resistance, and presented an alternative to Fascist cultural politics. Journals devoted specifically to music include Musica Viva (published in Brussels, in four languages), 23 (Vienna), and Der Auftakt (Prague). English-language music journals such as Modern Music and Musical Quarterly provide additional documentation of major international musical events and debates from the 1930s and 1940s.

          The student will carry out original research: searching for the relevant journals, then reading, identifying, and summarizing the material. The end product will include a database of relevant articles, along with prose summaries with information about the journals and authors. Harvard’s libraries contain rare original print runs of many of these periodicals, while others are available on microfilm. Many of these exile journals were short-lived, due to the massively unstable political situation as well as the beginning of the war in 1939. Some hard to find, particularly those published in the Soviet Union. Some are digitized and searchable, while others are not. The student will identify the journals, locate relevant articles, and research the political orientations and background of the journal, the editors, and the authors. We will work with Kerry Masteller, Music Reference and Research Librarian, Eda Kuhn Loeb Music Library, to help with digital searches, locating material, and setting up a RefWorks platform for recording and presenting the data. I have a detailed list of about 40 journals which can serve as a starting point.

          Project trajectory:

          Weeks 1 and 2:

          • reading background literature on music and migration, modernism, and political contexts of the time
          • learning the RefWorks platform and preparing keywords and categories for the database and summaries
          • learning how to use the relevant digital collections
          • starting work with one selected digitized journal: reading, selecting, and writing summaries of the relevant material

          Weeks 3 and 4:

          • For the journal you have selected, find out about its print run, political orientation, the biographies of its editors, and other information you think is relevant. Continue to research and write summaries
          • Choose one journal or newspaper that is not digitized (either hard copy or microfilm), develop strategies for finding information in it.
          • Search publications of the exile presses Querido (Amsterdam) and Éditions du Carrefour (Paris) for relevant titles. As you did with your first selected journal, find out about the background of these presses and their editors.
          • Starting working on journals devoted specifically to music, which include Musica Viva (published in Brussels, in four languages), 23 (Vienna), and Der Auftakt (Prague).

          Weeks 5 and 6:

          • In the American English-language journals Modern Music and Musical Quarterly (both digitized), search for articles by or about immigrants from wartime Europe.
          • Identify some of the official party journals of the German Communist Party (KPD) in exile and look for articles about music or aesthetic debates.
          • Do the same with the official organs of the German Socialist Party (SPD) and other socialist splinter groups, and with a couple of journals aimed at a readership of socialist workers’ choruses, such as the Schweizerische Sänger-Zeitung.

          Weeks 7 and 8:

          • Focus on the aesthetic debates in German-language journals published in Moscow, such as Das Wort and Internationale Literatur. (This includes the “Expressionismus-Debatte” of 1937.)
          • Search the Deutsche Zentral-Zeitung, published in Moscow, for relevant articles.

          Weeks 9 and 10:

          • Focus on literary exile journals such as Neue Deutsche Blätter (Prague), edited by Anna Seghers and others, Maß und Wert (Zürich), edited by Thomas Mann and others), and Die Sammlung (Amsterdam), edited by Klaus Mann and others.
          • Finish up the work, adding missing summaries and background information to the RefWorks database.
          • Prepare a list of “next steps” for future research.

          Learning outcomes: enhanced research skills, familiarity with digital collections of historical material, increased knowledge of music history and of political history before and during World War II, experience reading German texts, mastery of RefWorks (a useful platform for senior thesis bibliographies as well), and practice summarizing articles.

          The student for this project could also use this material to expand her/his own interests.  I will work with the student to develop projects.

          Skills required:  1) Excellent proficiency in reading German 2) Skills in good note taking and written summaries. 3) Musical background would be helpful, although not required.

          A student with reading proficiency in French or Italian could research left-wing newspapers and journals in those languages from the same time period.

           

          metaLAB (at) Harvard: Curricle (Schnapp)

           

          Project Supervisors: Mentored by metaLAB team, incl. Prof Jeffrey Schnapp, Jessica Yurkofsky, Matthew Battles, and  Sarah Newman, and working in collaboration with metaLAB graduate student Robert Roessler.

          Research themes: design, digital humanities, data visualization, interdisciplinarity, and the role of the liberal arts in society

          Project: Curricle. Work includes: design and historical research, user testing, student and alumni interviews, design work (with metaLAB team)
          Curricle is a prototype for a new experience in course selection: a digital platform that gives students powerful tools in data visualization and analytics for browsing, shopping, and selecting courses at Harvard. The platform will enable students to see the broader landscape within which they navigate the curriculum, offering more opportunities for choice and customization. Additionally, it will offer a historical research side for students and scholars to explore and visualize Harvard’s curricula over time.  Curricle's power—and its design challenge—consists in this use of data visualization both to map today's curriculum, and to visualize its historical development in previously unseen ways.  

          Specific role for SHARP fellow

          The SHARP fellow will be involved in a variety of aspects of Curricle's development. This will include: research to ground and contextualize the experience of course selection, including interviewing notable alumni about their curricular choices; design work and implementation (in collaboration with metaLAB team); testing versions of the interface with Harvard students; and archival research into historical curricula at Harvard and Radcliffe. The SHARP fellow will participate in weekly metaLAB and Curricle team meetings, and will have the chance to suggest and develop new paths of inquiry.

          We're seeking an independent and organized student who is interested in furthering his or her experience in working with a beta version of a new technological tool; preference will be shown for a fellow with interests in design, interdisciplinary studies, algorithms, and the history and role of the liberal arts in society. The student will have a chance to contribute meaningfully to this exciting new tool, and to work with a small research lab comprised of designers, coders, artists, and scholars.

           

           

          Critical and Primary Sources in LGBTQ History (Bronski)

           

          Project Supervisor: Michael Bronski, Professor of the Practice in Media and Activism

          Project Description              

          I am editing a four volume collection of the 100 most significant essays on Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) history. It is under contract with Bloomsbury Publishing as part of their Critical and Primary Sources series.The project is global in nature and will encompass multiple countries and cultures, as well as time periods. Bloomsbury’s Critical and Primary Sources series is sold, primarily, to public and university libraries often in the non-western world.

          Much of what is called LGBTQ Studies began in the United States and European countries. Many early germinal essays concerned western themes, incidents, and people. The last four decades has produced a wealth of work from African, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, and South Asian scholars interrogating their own national histories. This new scholarship has placed individual national histories in transnational contexts. These four volumes attempt to balance, and build upon, the older (often western-centered) work and place them in conversation with newer scholarship that broadens both the reach and the political intentionality of LGBTQ history. At the moment, the four volumes are tentatively arranged to cover: Vol 1 – theoretical work; Vol 2 – the pre-modern world; Vol 3 – the modern world; Vol 4 – contemporary political organizing and movements.

          The essays in these four volumes will have been previously published. They will range from the seminal work of Lillian Faderman on female friendships from the early 1970s to Rahul Rao’s contemporary studies of queerness, post-colonialism, and terrorism. This summer’s project, in large part, will be devoted to identifying important, significant works of LGBTQ history and then deciding which, working together, best communicate the fullness and breadth of the field.

          Working with me, a SHARP fellow will research and identify the existing scholarship, read and evaluate it, and place it in conversation with other works. The primary research here consists of finding – using Hollis+ as well as other library tools and archives – published articles; while it is thematically complex, basic research skills are all that are necessary.

          Once the essays are chosen I will write an Introduction to each volume as well as an Introduction to the collection. We will then shift to another research mode and I will need help mapping out, and documenting, the larger themes here as well as shape them into Introductory essays. I will also look to the student to help with conceptualizing, editing, and proof-reading the Introductions. The work is not clerical in nature.

          In the first stage of research the student will draw upon their knowledge and interest of history and sexuality to evaluate, with me, the articles to be chosen. In the second stage of research they will draw upon their research, bibliographic, writing and editing skills to help with the final versions of the Introductions.

          Project Opportunities and Trajectory

          The scope of this project is large but eminently feasible to complete during the ten weeks of the summer break. I will supervise the student’s work and help them to develop their research and evaluation skills as well as how to compare the articles to form a cohesive set of texts. While the student will be doing research on their own, regular communication as well as meeting at least twice a week will help us both with this work.

          Learning Outcomes and Skills

          A student who works on this project will grow in a number of ways. Their basic research and text evaluations skills will be increased and sharpened. It is also a great opportunity for a student to broaden and strengthen their knowledge not only of history (and LGBTQ history in particular), but their understanding of gender, sexuality, critical race, and post-colonial theory. There will be ample opportunity for them to use and expand their writing and editing skills in a professional context. Most important, a student who is interested in perusing a career in the  academia or publishing will learn how a book project is conceptualized, researched, compiled, edited, and delivered to a publisher. There is the potential, if my editor at Bloomsbury is open to it, for the SHARP fellow to interact with the editorial department of the publisher as well.

          Selection Criteria

          Students applying should have an interest, and ideally some reading knowledge of, basic aspects of LGBTQ history and politics, as well as gender and sexuality theory. They must have a desire to engage with these ideas and to be willing to explore them in expansive ways. (The global perspective here will be a learning curve for me as well and some of the learning here will be a joint experience.) Sharp attention to detail in research, note taking, handling of files, necessary communications with the publisher, and overall management of all of the aspects of the project are vital. The most important qualifications – aside from basic writing skills I presume most Harvard students have already – are the ability to engage, be continually curious, and be willing to learn as the research and the project develops.

           

          How Did the Past Taste? (Chaplin, Loren, Schultz & Peabody Museum)

           

          Project Supervisors: Joyce Chaplin, James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History; Diana Loren and Lainie Schultz, Academic Partnerships Department, Peabody Museum

          Project Description

          Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology is one of the oldest and largest anthropology museums in the world. It stewards over 1.2 million objects, comprised of archaeological, ethnological, osteological, and archival materials, as well as prints and photographs. The Peabody Museum engages in, supports, and promotes the study and appreciation of ancient and contemporary peoples from around the world. The Museum collects, preserves, and interprets cultural and related materials and offers unique opportunities for innovative teaching, research, and enrichment at Harvard and with communities worldwide.

          In 2018, the Peabody Museum will mount an exhibition curated by Professor Joyce Chaplin, on the history of food in Cambridge, MA. The exhibition explores how local cuisine became increasingly global through time, highlighting certain events in Harvard’s food history such as the 1766 Butter Rebellion.

          The SHARP fellow will contribute to the shaping of this exhibit through hands-on research of Peabody Museum collections, as well as primary and secondary sources potentially located elsewhere on the Harvard campus. This work may include:

          • A research review of particular objects, collections, or collectors;
          • Identification and exploration of interesting themes related to experiences of cooking and eating in New England;
          • Identification of relevant collections located in other Harvard institutions, such as the Museum of Comparative Zoology, the Harvard Herbaria, University Archives, Houghton and Schlesinger Libraries;
          • Recommendations for the visual display of exhibit themes, suitable to a variety of audiences.

          The fellow will be provided with a research space at the Peabody Museum, and will receive regular guidance and supervision from the Museum’s Academic Partnerships Department. The fellow will additionally meet or Skype once a week with Professor Chaplin, to discuss research progress and future directions.

          Learning Outcomes

          The fellow will enjoy a unique, hands-on experience working with museum collections, while gaining critical skills conducting primary research with non-literary sources. The fellow will learn about the process of exhibit development, and the challenge (and importance) of communicating research through a variety of media to a variety of audiences. The fellow will also receive training in professional museum practices, including object-handling, the use of collections databases, and principles of collections management, conservation, and registration.

          Selection Criteria

          This research must be conducted and conveyed to project supervisors according to rigorous standards of academic scholarship and citation, and must meet the standards of care and attention required of working with museum collections. Most importantly, the fellow chosen for this project must be able to think critically and creatively, to consider what sort of collections could contribute to the exhibit’s narrative and where they may be located; the narratives to which already-located collections can contribute; the suitability of various collections for display; and how to use collections to convey what may be complex ideas to an unknown visiting public.

           

          SHARP-Harvard Art Museums (Martinez, Odo)

           

          Project Supervisors: Jessica Martinez, Director of Academic and Public Programs; David Odo, Director of Student Programs and Research Curator of University Collections Initiatives

          Project Description
          Harvard Art Museums welcomes applications from undergraduates interested in public humanities to spend the summer researching public tour initiatives at the Museums. Students will develop and deliver regularly scheduled tours for visitors; will explore various models for gallery activities and guided visits for groups; and will develop an intensive guide for use by Phillips Brooks House Association groups and other community organizations who are interested in visiting the Harvard Art Museums. This work will include collections research, workshops with Museums staff from curatorial, education, conservation, and other departments, investigation of guided visit programs at peer institutions, outreach to PBHA groups, and the writing and editing of a final community-oriented group visit guide.

          SHARP fellows will conduct their research and writing work in the rich collections of the Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler Museums, newly united in a state-of-the-art facility designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop. Expanded galleries feature works from the ancient world to the present, and from the Americas, Europe, North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Asia.

          Agenda
          SHARP fellows will spend the summer researching and participating in public guided visit programs. Fellows will participate in a rigorous training program with Harvard Art Museums staff to gain knowledge of the Museums’ collections, develop skills in critical thinking, visual analysis, public speaking and leadership. Training will draw on scholarship and practice from multiple fields of knowledge, including curatorial practice, artistic practice, art history, conservation science, social sciences, and other areas.

          In addition to developing and delivering regularly scheduled tours, fellows will investigate multiple frameworks for interacting with groups in the gallery space, with an eye towards creating a model for engaging PBHA and other community-oriented groups on campus. They will create an outreach plan for engaging these groups, and their work will culminate in the writing, editing, and distribution of a complete guide to museum group visits for on-campus public service groups.  

          Outcomes
          Fellows will gain in-depth knowledge of specific objects and collection areas they will research to prepare their tours, as well as general knowledge of museum practice through structured and unstructured learning opportunities with a professional staff of curators, conservators, and technologists. Fellows will also gain a broad understanding of different models for public engagement in museums, as they research peer institutions and participate in gallery activity workshops. Finally, fellows will fully direct the research, writing, and distribution of a museum visit guide aimed at on-campus public service groups. By the end of the program, the fellow should have knowledge of Harvard Art Museums collections, improved research and writing skills, familiarity with different models for public engagement in museums, and experience creating and distributing educational materials for museums.

          Selection criteria
          No art history or museum experience necessary, but an enthusiasm and excitement about the Harvard Art Museums is required. We are seeking students with a welcoming and engaging demeanor and a comfort with public speaking; prior teaching/tutoring experience preferred. Preference given to students involved in Phillips Brooks House Association groups or programming. Please indicate if you are fluent in Spanish, Chinese/Mandarin or American Sign Language.

           

          AmgenBiotechnologyHarvard-Amgen Scholars form part of a vibrant community of researchers and receive summer lodging, partial board, and a stipend. Applicants will be placed in a lab based on their preferences.
          BLISSSocial_SciencesBehavioral Laboratory in the Social Sciences (BLISS) Fellows form part of a vibrant community of researchers and receive summer lodging, partial board, and a stipend. Applicants may select from a list of pre-designed projects.
          PCERAll FieldsHarvard College-Mindich Program in Community-Engaged Research (PCER) Fellows form part of a vibrant community of researchers and receive summer lodging, partial board, and a stipend. Applicants may select from a list of pre-designed projects.
          PRIMOBusiness / Social SciencesProgram for Research in Markets and Organizations (PRIMO) Fellows form part of a vibrant community of researchers and receive summer lodging, partial board, and a stipend. Applicants may select from a list of pre-designed projects.
          PRISESciencesProgram for Research in Science and Engineering (PRISE) Fellows form part of a vibrant community of researchers and receive summer lodging, partial board, and a stipend. Applicants must arrange their own research projects.
          SHARP

          Arts / Humanities / Library & Museum Studies

          Summer Humanities and Arts Research Program (SHARP) Fellows form part of a vibrant community of researchers and receive summer lodging, partial board, and a stipend. Applicants may select from a list of pre-designed projects or submit their own research proposals.
          SURGHGlobal HealthSummer Undergraduate Research in Global Health (SURGH) Fellows form part of a vibrant community of researchers and receive summer lodging, partial board, and a stipend. Applicants may select from a list of pre-designed projects.

          Overview

          The Summer Undergraduate Research in Global Health (SURGH) program is a 10-week summer program that aims to build community and stimulate creativity among a small cohort of Harvard undergraduate researchers in global health. SURGH fellows work on research projects with Harvard-affiliated faculty and researchers. Fellows live together in one of the Harvard College houses and participate in rich evening programming which includes both social and academic activities. To participate in SURGH, you must apply and be selected to work on one of the pre-designated SURGH research projects (usually announced in mid-January).

          Amgen

          The Amgen Scholars Program at Harvard is a 10-week faculty-mentored residential summer research program for undergraduates in biotechnology. Amgen Scholars will be paired with world-renowned faculty mentors and a director supervisor (postdoctoral scholar or graduate student) in the laboratory, following an interview selection process. Throughout the duration of the program, Amgen Scholars will conduct hands-on, innovative research across biotechnology fields in cutting-edge facilities at Harvard. While participating in the program, Amgen Scholars will reside in one of Harvard’s historic River Houses as active members of Harvard’s Summer Undergraduate Research Village community. In addition to research, Amgen Scholars will participate in a number of intellectual, pre-professional development, and social activities throughout the program.

          Overview

          The Harvard College-Mindich Program in Community-Engaged Research (PCER) is a 10-week immersive experience focused on community-engaged inquiry projects with local communities. The program will provide a small team of Harvard undergraduate researchers the opportunity to learn about collaboration and reciprocity in a research context, working on a pre-designed project alongside Harvard faculty in collaboration with community partners as part of a multidisciplinary research team. PCER fellows will develop skills necessary to carry out research that is academically rigorous as well as responsive to community interests and priority action areas. Fellows live together in one of the Harvard College houses and participate in rich evening and weekend programming that includes both social and academic activities.

          Program Details

          ABOUT PCER

          The Harvard College-Mindich Program in Community-Engaged Research (PCER) pilot is being launched in summer 2017 by the Mindich Program for Engaged Scholarship in collaboration with the Office of Undergraduate Research and Fellowships. PCER introduces students to the field of engaged scholarship, which seeks to advance the public purpose of higher education through scholarship that has impact within and beyond the academy through the discovery, integration, application, and communication of knowledge. Employing an asset-based appraoch, and focused on reciprocal relationships with community collaborators, engaged schlarship recognizes the perspectives, knowledge, and expertise present in communities and the academy are of equal value. PCER fellows contribute to the rich, interdisciplinary intellectual, social, and residential environment in activities that include roundtable talks with distinguished faculty speakers, pre-professional seminars, and opportunities to explore Harvard and the New England region more broadly.

          BENEFITS

          PCER offers a variety of benefits to ensure a successful summer research experience and enable fellows to form a close-knit community:

          • Free lodging in designated Harvard housing

          • A partial boarding plan (dining)

          • A modest research stipend for the 10-week program (plus an additional meals supplement)

          • For financial aid recipients: a term-bill credit covering the amount of the student’s Summer Savings obligations as determined by the Financial Aid Office

          COMPONENTS & EXPECTATIONS

          Program benefits and financial support are meant to enable PCER fellows to form a close-knit residential community. Therefore, PCER fellows are expected to participate in and contribute to the community of scholars in evening enrichment activities throughout the term of the program. While many activities are voluntary, other PCER activities (especially those associated with Harvard faculty) are required for all fellows.

          More specifically, PCER consists of the following components:

          • Research experience: The intent of the program is to provide a formative and substantive research experience over ten weeks of the summer, working on a project designed by specified Harvard faculty.

          • Residential life and community: PCER fellows will live together in one of the River Houses for the duration of the program: Weekday evening meal service will be available in Dudley House and a modest stipend will be available to purchase food for weekend meals and weekday lunches.

          • Special Campus-wide Events and Evening Programs: Special evening programming featuring prominent researchers and scientists in the Harvard community and the Boston area will be open to all Harvard undergraduates. Seminars for PCER fellows will include a number of topics specifically designed to augment and enrich their knowledge about research and careers in academic. Topics such as research ethics, poster presentations, and post-graduate opportunities will be offered throughout the program. In addition, fellows will have the opportunity to practice speaking about their research in both small and large groups throughout the summer.

          • Recreational and Social Programs: PCER fellows are eligible to register for free use of Harvard athletic facilities (including the Malkin Athletic Center, Hemenway Gymnasium, and Blodgett Pool). A calendar of activities will include a range of opportunities to socialize and take advantage of Boston’s cultural and recreational summer offerings, including a variety of excursions, Red Sox games, and fellow-initiated community events sponsored by URAF for the College-affiliated research programs.

           

          Project Description *** 2017 NOW AVAILABLE ***

          2017 PROJECT DESCRIPTION

          Gender, Race, and Violence Working Group
          Caroline Light

          How are Stand Your Ground laws, hyper-incarceration, domestic violence, and police violence inter-related? What are the gaps in our understanding of various types of violence?

          This interdisciplinary research team will explore these and other questions in partnership with community leaders in anti-violence advocacy work in the Boston area. Our activities will include analyzing data sets from the National Violent Death Reporting System and the Gun Violence Archive (among others) and possibly collecting additional data locally to bring an intersectional, multidimensional lens to the analysis of social scientific data on multiple forms of violence from the past 3-4 decades.

          We are seeking undergraduates with an openness to a variety of research methods/approaches as well as a willingness to work across the disciplines and social contexts in search of answers to our nation’s persistent problem with violence against people of color and women of all races and class backgrounds. Students will work independently and as part of a team; Students should be self-starters who can take initiative as well as collaborators who value different voices and perspectives. Work may include community-based work and field work, as well as within organizations on Harvard campus.

           

          Eligibility & Selection

          ELIGIBILITY

          • Any continuing Harvard College undergraduate in good standing
          • Must be able to commit 10 weeks* to summer research on campus

          * Note: individuals taking summer school courses, preparing for summer graduate school entrance exams, or engaging in other full-time public service projects are not eligible to participate in PCER

          SELECTION

          A primary purpose of the program is to build and foster a strong and diverse community of engaged scholars. Selection will be based on applicant responses to the essay questions and comments in letter of reference that the applicant is strongly suited for a successful summer enrichment experience.

          A successful application will demonstrate the following:

          • A strong dedication to developing or furthering academic interest and scholarly excellence in community-engaged research;
          • An eagerness to conduct research on the dedicated project, and an articulation of how that experience would enhance the applicant's academic pursuits;
          • The ability and desire to particupate successfully and enthusiastically in a diverse residential community of scholars, and an anticipation of the benefits of such participation;
          • An academic record demonstrating success in coursework that develops theoretical knowledge and/or practical application of academic principles in research;
          • A commitment to participate and contribute for the full ten weeks of the program.

          Evaluation of the applicant will be based on how well the components of the application define and address these qualities and requirements.

          Application - Deadline March 1, 2017

          PCER APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

          The deadline for receipt of COMPLETE application materials is 5:00pm EST, March 1, 2017.  INCOMPLETE OR LATE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED.

          _____________________________________________________________________________

          STEP 1:  READ

          Read the PCER program and project descriptions carefully.

           

          STEP 2: PREPARE YOUR MATERIALS

          PCER APPLICATION SUPPLEMENT
          Complete the PCER application supplement form, with concise answers to the eligibility questions. Save the completed form with your information in pdf format. To download the PCER Application Supplement Form, please click the button below.

          ESSAY RESPONSES
          Prepare a single document with your responses to the essay prompts on the application supplement and convert to pdf format to upload in CARAT.

          RESUME
          Save a resume that includes your work history and a description of your scholarly and extracurricular activities in pdf format.

          CURRENT TRANSCRIPT
          Obtain a copy of your latest unofficial transcript, including your fall course grades, to upload in CARAT. To access your unofficial transcript, login to my.harvard.edu. Select Student Home at the top of the page. Under Grades, select View Unofficial Transcript. In the Academic Institution drop down menu, select Harvard University. In the Report Type drop down menu, select Harvard College. Click View Report. Your Unofficial Transcript will open (make sure to have pop-ups enabled). Download and save in pdf format.

           

          STEP 3: SUBMIT YOUR MATERIALS

          Once you have completed the required application components found in the tabs of your funding source application in CARAT, upload and submit your application materials:

          • PCER Application Supplement Form
          • Essay Responses
          • Resume
          • Current Transcript